What's on our "Q"?

 The Skinny on Shakes for People With Diabetes

With so many meal replacements on the market, but how do you pick
which one is best? Taste shouldn’t be the only determining factor. It can
be important to consider the sugar, carbohydrate or even protein content.11 Nutritious, Kid-Friendly Finger Foods

Who doesn’t love meatballs? Check out this easy to follow recipe made
from lean turkey breast, which helps turn this usual calorie fest into something
a bit healthier. And while your at it, make sure to check out the Mango Tango Tortillas!

Jet-Set With Your Picnic Basket! Fun Theme Ideas for Lunch

Themed picnics are a great way to incorporate entertainment, flavor, and
even education into a family outing. Add a clever theme to your picnic by
incorporating foods from another city or, better yet, from around the world!

Also in “Q”: Remember to tune in for Restaurant Week 2012 recommendations, this Wednesday AM on CBS’s W1NY!!

 

The Ban On Soda In Containers:16 oz – Do you know you just guzzled 1.5 bagels??

In response to Laura’s appearance on Fox and Friends, Sunday morning hosted by Dave Briggs. Laura debated Mr. Wilson from Consumer Freedom. Some people are asking if Laura is in favor of  a nanny state. She is not in favor of this and shares her views here:

Everyone must make changes, both parents and policy makers need to reverse the obesity and diabetes epidemics. In general, people need to eat less and less of highly processed foods, including soda and chips.  America needs to become physically active again. I am not in favor of a nanny state, but the poor health of Americans, the hundreds of billions of dollars spent on medical care and the rise in both diabetes type I and II, scream for change.

Individuals must recognize, regardless of the source, added sugar in large doses is similar to drugs, and alcohol. These sugars affect the brain immediately. When someone has high blood sugar they cannot see or think clearly. Our nerves are damaged to the point of losing feeling in our limbs. In addition, our bodies respond to added sugar and sugar by releasing hormones such as insulin that lead to weight gain in the stomach and eventually diabetes.

The American environment is toxic to our health.
Yes, genetics are partly responsible for America’s health crisis, but the environment plays a huge role. Supersized portions, no gym for children in schools and encouraging eating while watching movies sets people up to fail at self care.
Perhaps a better proposal than the ban on soda is to have movie theaters change concessions stands to restaurants. Encouraging mindful eating before or after a movie rather than guzzling a soda during a film could aid in eating less.
Research shows mindless eating while watching movies and tv causes obesity. Do people realize that their 24 oz of soda is equal to a small meal? This small meal is equal to 1.5 bagels.

We are in an obesity and diabetes epidemic.
Again, I do not want a nanny state but the government is partly responsible for these epidemics since they subsidize food such as corn, issue food stamps to buy drinks with added sugars and other processed foods. Did you know Diabetes cost America 218 billion dollars in 2007? Imagine what the cost is now. The soda ban is not a costly proposal for America. Rather, it makes people aware that it is not normal, nor healthy to drink non-nutritional beverages in quantities greater than 16oz. We are in a crisis; Everyone must make changes, both parents and policy makers to get America eating well and moving more.

Bottom-Line
America must focus on eating foods for fuel – not mindless eating for boredom or stress. The goals should be to eat food that is high in nutrition like beans and berries– not empty calories. Focus on fresh, local food, not processed boxed food for at least 75 percent of your intake if not more. Finally, drink water or Perrier for hydration not soda. And please do not drink sport drinks or sell sport drinks in schools especially if the school doesn’t even offer gym class. Parents need to set boundaries with children, but so does the Food and Drug Administration and the food companies.

Tips to Avoid Mindless Eating

In 2009, I attended a seminar Turning Mindless Eating tm Into Mindless Weight Loss taught by Brian Wansink, PhD Food Psychologist at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. Here are the tips I learned:

Tips to Avoid Mindless Eating

  1. Repackage snacks into individual sized bags to prevent overconsumption. Larger containers make us more likely to over-indulge.
  2. Store foods in cupboards or the pantry rather than on the counter or other open area. You’ll be less likely to mindless munch on foods if you have to go out of your way to get them.
  3. Eat on smaller dinner plates. Using larger plates leads us to overfill our plate unintentionally and consequently eat more.
  4. Be cautious of food labels claiming “low-fat,” “low-sugar,” or “low-calorie.” These foods can cause people to overeat because they don’t feel as “guilty” about consuming them in comparison to the regular versions.
  5. If you are feeling sad, don’t use food to try to improve your mood.  Instead, try going for a walk, watching a movie, or talking to a friend.
If you like these tips, show your appreciation by subscribing to
www.EatingandLivingModerately.com, like Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services on Facebook and by checking out our latest blogging adventure www.MomDishesItOut.com. Thanks!

Are you trying to lose weight?

If you are trying to lose weight by restricting during the day, be aware that this causes binging. This is a constant theme that unveils itself regularly in nutrition sessions with my clients. Instead of sabotaging your efforts, work slowly and in phases. Go from A to B to C. Do not attempt to go from A to Z. Work on health promotion and adding filling food. Avoid a negative mindset and daily weigh – ins. Be mindful, patient and accepting.

100% Juice is okay

In a study reported in the Archives of Pediatrics, children age 2-11 who consumed 100% juice about 4 oz daily also had a higher intake of whole fruits. There was no difference in weight status or the likelihood of being overweight among the 100% juice drinkers. Theresa A. Nicklas; Carol E. O’Neil; Ronald Kleinman
Association Between 100% Juice Consumption and Nutrient Intake and Weight of Children Aged 2 to 11 Years
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008;162(6):557-565.

TAKE HOME MESSAGE FOR PARENTS AND CAREGIVERS:

100% juice is okay in moderation. Be sure the juice you give is 100%.