Weight Shaming is Such a Shame

Weight Shaming is Such a Shame

By Lauren Cohen and Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Photo Credit: ashley rose, via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: ashley rose, via Compfight cc

There are a series of phrases out there so vile that I am embarrassed by the following sentence. They include; “thigh gap,” “food shaming,” “FUPA,” and “butterface.” These are just a few of the grotesque ways we have manipulated the English language to diminish the beauty of another person. A person.  A person who is made of cells, and matter, and muscle, and fibers, and water, and feelings, and emotions, and self-hate. We don’t need your help to belittle ourselves—we do just fine on our own. But we don’t have to.

 

Weight shaming—or perhaps better described as body shaming—is something we all fall victim to. It’s easy to accidentally offend. When I was thirteen, gangly and tall with a rough case of acne, a woman pulled me aside while I was bathing suit shopping. I was in a bikini and she asked me, with a soft and serious tone, if I was eating enough and if I would like her to speak to my mother. I was horrified, confused, and virtually naked. I am sure she had good intentions; but I can still feel today that sensation of brutal exposure.

 

Body shaming is a real life nightmare. It feels like walking into to your high school cafeteria completely nude. The room falls silent and everyone laughs. I don’t need to explain it to you—no doubt you have felt it at one point or another. But… why?

 

It comes from all over. From our parents and our friends, from the media and from ourselves. As a society, we forget that people are built just the way they are built. Everybody is different and every body is different. Sometimes they’re small; sometimes they’re large. Sometimes busty or curvy or lean or petite. There are extremes, of course, and those often require nutrition intervention for both over and under nutrition. But for the majority of the population—we need to work on some serious body loving.

 

There is a theory out there—the set-point theory—arguing that individual bodies maintain a certain weight and frame for extended periods of time. If you think of your lifespan as a graph, this would be a plateau. Provided that the plateau is not in an extreme, I like the idea behind this theory. To me, it is a scientific way of asserting that your body is all your own.

 

Your body is very smart. Think about it. It knows how to take care of itself, when to ask you for more food, when to enforce more sleep, when to suggest an appealing exercise or crave a specific meal. Your body takes care of you—now it’s time for you to take care of your body. Give it some lovin’.

 

 

How do you show your body love? What can we do to help prevent body shaming?

 

4 Tips To Feeding Your Inner Self With Self Care

This post is an excerpt from a previously published blog post on YourTango, to see the original post click here.
Photo Credit: NA.dir via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: NA.dir via Compfight cc

In a world of external focus where a scale determines your worth and your salary defines your success, you need to turn inward to find wellness and well-being. In order to survive and create balance, start connecting with your inner core — your true self. But how can you make this connection when everything around you points to the polar opposite of looking outward?

Here are my favorite ways to self-care that allow for connecting with yourself and feeling the best. The beautiful thing is that you don’t need to shell out money in order to utilize these methods. All of the following tips ultimately affect food intake, so pay close attention. They will help lead you on your journey to feeling and being well.

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1. De-Stress Your Nervous System

That’s right! Rid pain, inflammation and more with my favorite at home self-care set. It is the “melt method” and props. This method is not about melting away your love handles. It’s about ridding pain while also restoring balance to your nervous system ultimately affecting digestion, energy levels and more.

I was first introduced to this method by my master gyrotonic and pilates instructor, Michelle Spinner, at Kinected Studios in NYC. Michelle, as well as my rolfing practitioner, Marie Zahn, always told me, it starts in our feet. If your feet are “off,” your body will be “off.” It makes perfect sense, yet most people never think about their feet when contemplating well-being.

So start from the tips of your toes, and work your way up. Use the melt hand and foot treatment with the melt balls. These little balls may not exactly feel heavenly the first time you use them, but they work. I started using them last Fall, and by the time winter rolled around, I noticed remarkable change.

This was the first year that I was able to ski pain-free since 1996! I used the melt method every night after skiing. The best thing about this new tool? The balls are travel-friendly! You can easily transport the balls with you wherever you go. The melt balls enable you to be proactive with your own form of manual therapy!

 
Read more at YourTango: http://www.yourtango.com/experts/laura-cipullo/4-tips-feed-yourself-self-care#ixzz35KZrcZnd

If you make resolutions, vow to choose these:

Vow to:

Take One Step at a Time.

Are you thinking about your 2012 resolutions? Consider this: Rather than making brash diet resolutions, make small changes in your intake instead to prevent the feeling of deprivation or a potential binge. For example, if you are feeling guilty from over-consuming during the holidays, identify one thing you can change. Make it a small change and start today rather than waiting until January 1st. Perhaps you decide to decrease your dinner portion by 25%. Do this for 1 week and then add another modification on week 2, such as enjoying one cookie after lunch rather than 4 after dinner. Remember that moderation is key when it comes to your nutritional intake and setting health goals—and achieving them with ease.

 

Eat Like You Have Diabetes.

There are 70 million American children and adults at risk for diabetes. Don’t let it be you. Eating consistent meals and snacks that incorporate a blend of wholesome carbohydrates, lean proteins and healthy fats (MUFA’s and Omega 3 FA’s) will leave you feeling full longer, prevent a hormone rollercoaster and eventually aid in consuming less and depositing less body fat. Vow to eat mixed meals with an average of 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal.

Feed Yourself.

Don’t starve yourself with endless fad cleanses and one-meal-a-day dinner diets. Rather than skipping meals and slowing your resting metabolic rate, eat every 3 to 4 hours. If your stomach is grumbling at the start of a meal, you are more likely to overeat or even binge once your plate arrives. Worse yet, overeating and/or binging at the end of the day results in the consumption of more calories than had you eaten from breakfast until dinner. Vow to feed yourself regular meals and snacks to ultimately be a healthier you.

 

Center Before Meals.

Take a deep yoga breath and practice a simple mindful meditation before each meal. This will help you to relax and to separate your eating experience from your hectic day. You will be able to better recognize your fullness cues and, more importantly, to provide your brain with the opportunity to be psychologically satisfied with the food you have eaten and experienced. Vow to practice this form of “centering” daily to prevent over-consuming, decrease emotional snacking and develop a healthier relationship with food and eating.

 

Other Recommended Resolutions:

Vow to become a mindful eater.

Vow to put yourself & your health first.

Vow to love your body.

Follow my additional recommended resolutions 12/31/2011 on twitter @MomDishesItOut.