What's on our "Q"?

 The Skinny on Shakes for People With Diabetes

With so many meal replacements on the market, but how do you pick
which one is best? Taste shouldn’t be the only determining factor. It can
be important to consider the sugar, carbohydrate or even protein content.11 Nutritious, Kid-Friendly Finger Foods

Who doesn’t love meatballs? Check out this easy to follow recipe made
from lean turkey breast, which helps turn this usual calorie fest into something
a bit healthier. And while your at it, make sure to check out the Mango Tango Tortillas!

Jet-Set With Your Picnic Basket! Fun Theme Ideas for Lunch

Themed picnics are a great way to incorporate entertainment, flavor, and
even education into a family outing. Add a clever theme to your picnic by
incorporating foods from another city or, better yet, from around the world!

Also in “Q”: Remember to tune in for Restaurant Week 2012 recommendations, this Wednesday AM on CBS’s W1NY!!

 

The Epidemic of Diabetes

Hydrate with water, not soda

Regardless of weight and age, America is heading towards a Diabetes epidemic. Americans must change their lifestyles by moving more, and eating less.

Diabetes does not discriminate based on overall weight. America needs to focus on decreasing belly fat, specifically, eating less processed food and moving more.

 

Based on the study reported in the Journal of Pediatrics, Diabetes is increasing in our teen population. There was a 14% increase in prediabetes and diabetes in a ten year period. In 1999 – 2000, there was a 9% incidence of prediabetes and diabetes in teenagers between ages 12- 19. In 2007- 2008, there was a 23 % incidence of prediabetes and diabetes. This is more than two fold. However, the study also revealed this was regardless of weight. Across the weight spectrum, all teens had an increase in the incidence of Diabetes. In my mind, this is a Diabetes Epidemic not an obesity epidemic.

Obesity did not increase in our youth during this ten year period from 1999 – to 2008. One study from the NHANES reports an actual decrease in teen obesity, despite an increase in prediabetes and diabetes. Also, half of the participants in the study had at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which means everyone needs intervention.

So what is the intervention? It depends on who you ask but the many agree America must move more, eat less processed food, and practice stress relief. America is eating too much and not moving enough. We are a culture of convenience. People need to eat because they are hungry rather than bored. We need to eliminate highly processed food such as chips and soda. We need to feel full with fiber and drink for hydration. Simple solutions are to replace chips with fiber rich berries and soda with bubbly water like Perrier. Ideally, we need to decrease insulin resistance and belly bulge (aka abdominal obesity).

The study admits to flaws. One of the flaws is the tool BMI – Body Mass Index. This measurement tool uses overall weight and height, not accounting for muscle mass and frame. Football players are considered obese when using BMI. A better tool to assess for obesity, belly fat, insulin resistance and or risk for diabetes would be the waist to height ratio. This tool would not qualify the typical football player as obese.

On Tuesday, I had the opportunity to share some of these thoughts with the HLN audience. Click here to see the clip.

 

May AL, Kuklina EV, Yoon PW. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors among US adolescents, 1999−2008. Pediatrics. 2012;peds.2011-1082.

If you make resolutions, vow to choose these:

Vow to:

Take One Step at a Time.

Are you thinking about your 2012 resolutions? Consider this: Rather than making brash diet resolutions, make small changes in your intake instead to prevent the feeling of deprivation or a potential binge. For example, if you are feeling guilty from over-consuming during the holidays, identify one thing you can change. Make it a small change and start today rather than waiting until January 1st. Perhaps you decide to decrease your dinner portion by 25%. Do this for 1 week and then add another modification on week 2, such as enjoying one cookie after lunch rather than 4 after dinner. Remember that moderation is key when it comes to your nutritional intake and setting health goals—and achieving them with ease.

 

Eat Like You Have Diabetes.

There are 70 million American children and adults at risk for diabetes. Don’t let it be you. Eating consistent meals and snacks that incorporate a blend of wholesome carbohydrates, lean proteins and healthy fats (MUFA’s and Omega 3 FA’s) will leave you feeling full longer, prevent a hormone rollercoaster and eventually aid in consuming less and depositing less body fat. Vow to eat mixed meals with an average of 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal.

Feed Yourself.

Don’t starve yourself with endless fad cleanses and one-meal-a-day dinner diets. Rather than skipping meals and slowing your resting metabolic rate, eat every 3 to 4 hours. If your stomach is grumbling at the start of a meal, you are more likely to overeat or even binge once your plate arrives. Worse yet, overeating and/or binging at the end of the day results in the consumption of more calories than had you eaten from breakfast until dinner. Vow to feed yourself regular meals and snacks to ultimately be a healthier you.

 

Center Before Meals.

Take a deep yoga breath and practice a simple mindful meditation before each meal. This will help you to relax and to separate your eating experience from your hectic day. You will be able to better recognize your fullness cues and, more importantly, to provide your brain with the opportunity to be psychologically satisfied with the food you have eaten and experienced. Vow to practice this form of “centering” daily to prevent over-consuming, decrease emotional snacking and develop a healthier relationship with food and eating.

 

Other Recommended Resolutions:

Vow to become a mindful eater.

Vow to put yourself & your health first.

Vow to love your body.

Follow my additional recommended resolutions 12/31/2011 on twitter @MomDishesItOut.

 

How do you cook for someone with Diabetes?

One of the mantras I remember learning while studying for my CDE (Certified Diabetes Educator) exam in 2002 was “A carbohydrate is a carbohydrate.” The message is one can still have their cake and eat it too even if they have diabetes. Timing and quantity are key to eating all foods in moderation.

Read my newsletter to learn Diabetes Cooking 101: http://www.lauracipullollc.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/newsletter2006mar.pdf.