What's on our "Q"?

 The Skinny on Shakes for People With Diabetes

With so many meal replacements on the market, but how do you pick
which one is best? Taste shouldn’t be the only determining factor. It can
be important to consider the sugar, carbohydrate or even protein content.11 Nutritious, Kid-Friendly Finger Foods

Who doesn’t love meatballs? Check out this easy to follow recipe made
from lean turkey breast, which helps turn this usual calorie fest into something
a bit healthier. And while your at it, make sure to check out the Mango Tango Tortillas!

Jet-Set With Your Picnic Basket! Fun Theme Ideas for Lunch

Themed picnics are a great way to incorporate entertainment, flavor, and
even education into a family outing. Add a clever theme to your picnic by
incorporating foods from another city or, better yet, from around the world!

Also in “Q”: Remember to tune in for Restaurant Week 2012 recommendations, this Wednesday AM on CBS’s W1NY!!

 

Pizza, Pizza!

Pizza is a favorite meal of many children (and many parents, too!), but due to its often high saturated fat content and refined carbohydrates, it tends to be less than a wholesome meal. You can make some simple changes to your pizza to make it a more nutrient dense choice.

  • Switch to a whole-wheat crust. This will provide more nutrients and fiber than the traditional white crust and leave you and your kids fuller and more satisfied. Many pizzerias are now offering the whole-wheat option so be sure to ask when ordering. If whole-wheat is not available, flatbread crusts are also a good option. At home, you can make pizza dough by subbing whole-wheat flour for white. For a frozen pizza, Amy’s, DiGiorno, and other lines are beginning to carry whole-wheat pizzas. Another fun option is using whole wheat English muffins (I love Thomas’ 100% Whole Wheat)—that way everyone can have their own mini personal pizza!
  • Make your sauce smart. Tomato sauce is an integral part of any good pizza and it provides many vitamins and minerals as well the phytochemical lycopene which promotes heart health. However, many sauces are high in sodium. When making pizza at home, select a sauce with no salt added. When ordering out, try a Pizza Margherita to limit the sodium.
  • Pack on the veggie toppings. Spinach, broccoli, onions, tomatoes, eggplant, mushrooms—the options are endless. These veggies turn your simple slice of pizza into a delicious nutritional powerhouse. This is also a good opportunity to introduce a new vegetable to your family. By serving it with a familiar food such as pizza, kids will be more open-minded to trying the new food.
  • Pick a protein. While the pizza’s cheese proves as a source of protein in the dish, pizza becomes a more balanced meal when one additional ounce of protein is added to it. This protein will help keep your family fuller longer. Select a lean protein such as grilled chicken, low-sodium ham, or grilled tofu. Limit the pepperoni and sausage slices. These meats are high in sodium and saturated fats.
  • Serve a side salad. It is easy to consume too many slices of pizza. To help you get in better touch with your hunger signals, pair your slice with a side salad, a handful of raw carrots, or a fruit salad.
  • Enjoy it with family and friends. Pizza is a food that is often served in celebration. It is a common choice at birthday parties, soccer championships, and family get-togethers. Make these events about enjoying the company of those around you rather than solely focusing on the food.

Surviving the Holidays with Diabetes

Surviving the Holidays with Diabetes is a Family Affair

Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE – Dietitian, Diabetes Educator, and Mom

www.EatingandLivingModerately.com & www.MomDishesItOut.com

 

 

Make peace with carbs: Just because you or your loved one has Diabetes, it doesn’t mean carbohydrates are the enemy.

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  1. Plan ahead by counting carbohydrates and spreading them out throughout the day.
  2. Make carbohydrates like pasta and rice, a side dish rather than the entrée.

Designate Dessert: If you love sweets, include them in your intake.

  1. Rather than feel deprived and end up binging, plan your piece of cake. Eat protein and veggies for your entrée and use your carbs for dessert.
  2. The family chef can make mini desserts or just make less dessert, avoiding temptation.

Walk Your Sugar Down: Moving after a meal is helpful to reduce blood glucose.

  1. After the holiday meal, get your entire family up and out to see holiday decorations or have a snowball fight.
  2. Walking and or light exercise helps to lower your blood glucose and consequently your insulin.

It’s a Family Affair: If you or your loved one has Diabetes, have the entire family engaged and have everyone eat as if they had Diabetes.

  1. It’s sabotage to offer the rest of the guests food that someone else can’t have. If the family eats the same foods, pasta as the side rather than the entrée, no one will feel left out and no one will be tempted to overload on carbohydrates.
  2. Family member are genetically at risk for Diabetes. If the whole family eats in a balanced manner, you will be helping to prevent their chances of Diabetes later in life.

Mix Your Meals: Eat carbohydrates, proteins and fat together.

  1. Protein and fat take longer to digest. If you eat your carbohydrates with these foods, the carbs will be digested slowly and your blood sugar less likely to spike.
  2. Mixing meals and snacks help to regulate blood sugar and hormones and consequently help to keep you feeling satiated longer.
    1. Shrimp Cocktail with cocktail sauce
    2. Greek yogurt with fresh fruit
    3. Hummus with veggies and warm whole wheat pita
    4. Mini turkey meatballs with marinara
    5. Veggie and low fat cheese napoleons

How do you cook for someone with Diabetes?

One of the mantras I remember learning while studying for my CDE (Certified Diabetes Educator) exam in 2002 was “A carbohydrate is a carbohydrate.” The message is one can still have their cake and eat it too even if they have diabetes. Timing and quantity are key to eating all foods in moderation.

Read my newsletter to learn Diabetes Cooking 101: http://www.lauracipullollc.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/newsletter2006mar.pdf.