The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

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The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

What Happens on the Bike…

Photo Credit: RambergMediaImages via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: RambergMediaImages via Compfight cc

What Happens on the Bike…
By Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE, CEDRD

About three years ago, my good friend Jaime invited me to go to spin class with her. She would come over every Sunday and literally stand above my bed and ask me if I was ready. I was a mom with two very young kids, a professional career, and a husband who worked all of the time. Was I ready? Of course not! But all I had to do was throw on leggings, a tank top and sunglasses to cover the mascara smudges around my eyes from the day before! The spin studio was rather dark inside so no one would see that I hadn’t used my make-up remover. Well, what happened on that bike was more than I ever hoped might happen! Thank you, Jaime, for dragging me out of bed! Thank you, Robert, for watching the kids! And thank you, Janet, for reminding me of my own possibilities.

 

Once I got to class that first morning, I never looked back. Now please realize…I’m not talking about spinning right now, but rather about having the time to dream again, to set goals again, and to just feel the remarkable joy of moving in my own body. I had been in a motorcycle accident in 1996; since that time, I’d never been able to ski, run, or even wear my stilettos without severe consequences and/or extreme pain. But cycling was easier on my leg…and it gave me back “my edge.” It provided me with the opportunity—as Janet, the spin instructor advised—to set an intention on the bike for when you were literally off the bike. She didn’t talk about calories (well, maybe sometimes); instead she spoke of envisioning something you wanted to achieve and riding for that purpose. I took her every word seriously. And while on that bike, I decided that I was going to pursue my dream of writing a book.

 

Week after week, I went to my church (“Soul Cycle”), as Janet would say—to envision my book and sometimes to ride for a friend or family member in need of positive energy. But I have to admit that it was in Janet’s class every Sunday morning that I reminded myself that I really could do this.

 

I soon learned that writing a book and getting it published by a big publishing house was, in short, a seemingly backward process. Instead of writing a book and then trying to get your name and book into the public eye, I was advised by all the top editors to start a personal blog (that project eventually became MomDishesItOut) and then to go straight to television. Many advised me to skip writing a book altogether, but a book was important to me—a stepping stone in my career, something I personally wanted to do, and something I really wanted to accomplish for my mom. So I decided to take the route of working in the media while trying to write the book too. But my time was limited, and after six months of media appearances, I received my first offer to write a book. This was not necessarily my dream book, but then again, I’d never specified which book I wanted to write while I spent all those Sundays spinning away! The book’s subject was, however, close to my heart because it was about diabetes. You see, all the men in my family have diabetes. Each had helped me in my career. Whether it was letting me come along on their appointments with dietitians or introducing me to their doctors, it was meaningful to me. So, this book could, and would, be my tribute to all of them.

 

In the fall of 2013, what happened on that bike actually became my reality. Rodale published my first book, The Diabetes Comfort Food Diet Cookbook, authored by me and the editors of Prevention Magazine. And then, just one month later, I self-published my second book, Healthy Habits: 8 Essential Nutrition Lessons Every Parent and Educator Needs. I dedicated my first book to my family members with diabetes and, of course, to my mother. My second book is not dedicated to anyone specifically; rather, it’s for every person with great hope that each will one day create a positive relationship with eating and a neutral relationship with food. It’s for my children, my clients, and all the parents out there who receive mixed messages on nutrition. This is the book that focuses on self-care and nutrient density, not weight loss and what you can’t have. It’s sort of like spinning. I spin to take care of myself and set goals rather than to lose weight or punish myself for eating a holiday dinner.

Photo Credit: rachel a. k. via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: rachel a. k. via Compfight cc

So find your vehicle—whether it’s a spin bike or a yoga mat or even a pew in your own spiritual temple. Set your intentions for 2015. And then let us know what happens! And again, thank you Jaime, Robert and Janet.

Wait!!! You’re a male with an eating disorder?

By Dr. Tony Wendorf, Guest Blogger

In a culture that values image so much, women may feel a lot of pressure to look a certain way.  Over the last few decades the movement toward valuing “being thin” has progressed at an alarming rate. Eating disorders have also followed suit and increased over the last 10-20 years.

Perhaps society is to blame, or it may just be that we have gotten better at understanding and recognizing what an eating disorder looks like. For years we have placed so much clinical attention on females with eating disorders that we completely ignored similar symptoms in males when, in fact, The Academy of Eating Disorders recently released statistics demonstrating a 10:1 female to male ratio. This gap is only continuing to get closer and closer the more we learn about males with eating disorders.

Typically, men have a later age of onset (21 years old) versus women (18 years old). Men typically do not seek treatment as quickly as females (nearly four years later). When men do seek treatment, their hospital stays are typically almost three full weeks shorter than females. Not surprisingly, we also see that males tend to die sooner after hospitalization than females.

Men diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa—Restricting Type are the most likely to die following treatment. It’s possible that this alarming notion is due to the fact that men are admitted and discharged based on a lower Body Mass Index (BMI), which contributes to quicker fatality. The older the male is for admission, the more likely they are to die sooner than someone who is admitted at a younger age.  And yet another contributing factor is poor social support, which naturally results in the likelihood of death.

Many of the clinical symptoms of an eating disorder are similar, if not identical between males and females.  However, there are a few significant differences. For one, many males with eating disorders have struggled with a history of being premorbidly overweight.  This is not the case with females. Additionally, males do not tend to attempt suicide nearly as frequently as females with eating disorders. Anecdotally speaking, many males with eating disorders are having or have actively dealt with struggles with their sexuality. This may also contribute to body image dissatisfaction and distortion. Lastly, a great number of men with eating disorders struggle with Binge Eating Disorder, which is not currently listed in the DSM-IV-TR, but clearly has a distinct clinical pattern that requires immediate attention—immediate attention that is often not received.

The message is clear. Eating disorders do not discriminate between males and females.  As a professional in the field, there is a greater push to treat men with eating disorders and far more training available to better address this population. If you believe that yourself or a loved one is struggling with an eating disorder, it is highly encouraged that you seek immediate evaluation. I highly recommend the following facilities:

Rogers Memorial Hospital: www.rogershospital.org
800-767-4411

Rosewood Ranch, Center for Eating Disorders: www.rosewoodranch.com
800-845-2211

My contact information:
Dr Tony Wendorf
Licensed Clinical Psychologist #2977-57
Specializing in Recovery for Eating Disorder Individuals
tonywendorf@gmail.com

 

 Author

Dr. Tony Wendorf is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist who specializes in the treatment of eating disorders and is a professor in the Masters of Counseling program at Mount Mary College in Milwaukee, WI for courses in Multicultural psychotherapy, Psychopathology, and Eating Disorders. Dr Wendorf is a psychologist at The REDI Clinic. Prior to joining the REDI Clinic, Dr. Wendorf completed his Doctoral Residency at Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare-All Saints in Racine. During this time he was part of the consultation-liaison team in the medical hospital, established an eating disorder therapy group, saw eating disorder patients for individual therapy and conducted psychological and neuropsychological evaluations.Dr. Wendorf gained specialty training in treating males with eating disorders during his time at Rogers Memorial Hospital as the primary therapist for the male program in the residential Eating Disorder Center. Additionally, he has specialized training in Maudsley Family Therapy (FBT).

Dr. Wendorf received his Bachelors Degree in Psychology from UW-Milwaukee, his Masters Degree in Clinical Psychology from the Wisconsin School of Professional Psychology and his Doctoral Degree in Clinical Psychology from Wisconsin School of Professional Psychology. He is a member of multiple professional organizations including the Academy for Eating Disorders (AED), National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp), the American Psychological Association (APA), National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) and the Wisconsin Psychological Association (WPA).


What Is Gestalt Therapy?

Gestalt Therapy is a growth-oriented approach to working with people that emphasizes context and relationship. The Gestalt approach embraces a person’s physical, psychological, intellectual, emotional, interpersonal and spiritual experience. Each of these interconnected aspects of living is considered inseparable from a person’s environment, history and culture.

A Psychotherapeutic Approach

 

Gestalt therapy seeks to develop awareness, support creative choice and encourage responsibility in a person’s effort to realize and effective, meaningful and fulfilling life. From a Gestalt perspective a well-lived life is grounded in a person’s awareness of how they live their life and conduct their relationships in the present.

 

The Gestalt practitioner works to create a relationship with a client that is respectful and attuned. The immediacy of the emerging dialogue creates a space in which the client feels recognized and affirmed by the therapist. A delicate balance of support and challenge is used when addressing the client’s hopes and concerns.

The Gestalt approach places more emphasis on describing and understanding the unique experience of a client rather than interpreting and generalizing about the client’s experience. The use of creative experimentation involves the therapist and client co-creating new ways for the client to be in the world with greater satisfaction.