The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

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The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

Fed Up? Well I am Fed Up With Blame!

Fed Up? Well I am Fed Up With Blame!
By Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team
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Do scare tactics work?

I know the new documentary Fed Up declares that scare tactics have worked for decreasing tobacco sales. Personally, I worry that scare tactics will actually contribute to more fat shaming, diet shaming and finger pointing.

I was really surprised that Katie Couric narrated this film directing negative attention toward Michelle Obama, food companies and one evil — sugar. My surprise is specific to Katie’s history of an eating disorder.

As a certified eating disorder specialist, I know and hope Katie knows that deprivation and shaming lead only to more binging, overeating and weight gain. This black and white delineation simply contributes to the eating disorder mentality.

In addition, I personally don’t think scaring people into not eating sugar is any better than scaring them into not eating fat back in the 80s. That particular scare tactic definitely didn’t work. We all got “fatter”.

If we isolate just one macronutrient, people will continue to eat it secretly. Meanwhile, food companies easily reformulate their products to meet the new standard. Scaring and blaming merely nurture the “poor health epidemic” we have today.

That’s right! Here’s another very important point. First, let’s rename the “obesity epidemic”. Let’s call it the “processed food epidemic” or the “ill health epidemic.” Obesity is usually just the most visible symptom of a much larger problem.

As Fed Up points out, there are “skinny” fat people who are just as unhealthy. So why do we call this problem an obesity epidemic? It’s about health not size.

 

Read more at Your Tango: http://www.yourtango.com/experts/laura-cipullo/fed-well-i-am-fed-blame#ixzz362jGl4bj

The Favoring of Flavoring

The Favoring of Flavoring
Lauren Cohen and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

 

“And… how does it taste?”

 

This is my least favorite question. I’m not sure… maybe nutty? No? This is very stressful for me. Perhaps, smoky? Is that a way to describe food? Can you give me a list of words to work with? I’m really not good at this. It’s a banana. It tastes like banana.

 

I found solace in a recent conference at New York University, The Science of Human Flavor Perception, confirming that describing and tasting food was much more then a question and answer. It is a complex chemical conversation between your brain and the foods you are eating. While the popular thought is that taste is generated from the contact between food and your taste buds, it really is not the case. Let’s try to make this a little more digestible.

 

Think of your taste buds as “food receptors” that receive the food and send a signal to the brain. The brain then responds and generates taste. More interesting, perhaps, is that taste cells are all over the body meaning we sense taste everywhere! While the flavor is in the food, and not your brain, the taste in your mouth is generated by these brain signals.

Photo Credit: Alan Cleaver via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Alan Cleaver via Compfight cc

Though, in all fairness, we can’t begin to talk about taste until we understand smell. Without the ability to smell, food would lose almost its entire flavor, with the exception of its basic elements—sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami. You can test this by taking out a flavor-full snack, like a jellybean. Chew on a jellybean for a moment to recognize the taste and then close your nose. Did you notice that the flavor went away? This is because you lost the ability to breath and smell through your nose or retronasal olfaction. Without this key component, taste is almost entirely eradicated.

 

So why do we like things and dislike others? A study coming out of the University of Trieste suggests that there is a genetic component to taste perception and preference. While the study is still in its preliminary phases, the research suggests that individuals could have genetic coding that enables them to prefer a food. This would mean that someone who has an inclination towards salt might have more of a link to the food than we earlier realized. While it would seem that the taste is what is drawing an individual to the food, this study suggests that the genetic coding actually keeps you coming back for more. Research such as this could potentially help us understand individuals link to hypertension and other diseases connected to over consuming nutrition.

Photo Credit: comingstobrazil via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: comingstobrazil via Compfight cc

Aside from a genetic link, there is a recent study, coming out of Monell Chemical Scenes Center in Philadelphia, PA, connecting taste to stress. Furthermore, scientists believe there may be a specific connection between stress and sweet. The study suggests that taste cells around the body, specifically the ones in the gut, are deeply affected by stress. They may influence the metabolism of sugars and increase our affinity towards them.  Perhaps this explains my inclination towards Oreos when someone asks me to describe a flavor.

 

So what does this mean for us? It means that nutrition is far more individual then we could have ever imagined! We already know that everyone’s bodies require different daily calories, different distributions of nutrients, and different types of physical care for overall health but now we are learning that people intrinsically favor different flavors. This could have the potential to help prevent diseases connected with over consuming nutrition such at diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension.

 

The creation of taste is so much more than just a connection between food and our mouths. It is a connection between taste buds, taste cells, genetic coding and more. Next time you eat, you can chew on this.

 

 

So, how did this post taste to you? Do you favor flavors?

 

 

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