The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

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The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.

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Entertain the Concept of Health this Holiday Season

Photo Credit: ecstaticist via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: ecstaticist via Compfight cc

Tis the season of food, food and food. So how do we manage our health while entertaining and celebrating?  Instead of fearing weight gain or trying for weight loss during the holidays, let yourself maintain your current weight. Think slow and steady wins the race. However this is not a race rather an almost 2 month period of eating and drinking.  This year, vow to make the holiday season healthy with family and friends as the focus and these tips to plan a mindful season balanced between food and fitness.

5 Tips Celebrate Health and Holidays

  1. Focus on Family and Friends – Growing up in an Italian family I remember the holidays were about food and family. Instead of making food for 25 people, we made enough for 50 people. Instead of sitting around the fire, we sat around the table. If this was your family, start a new tradition this year. Celebrate you health and the holiday season by focusing on family and friends not food. Have family and friends come over to socialize rather than eat. You can serve food, but don’t center the evening on/around the food and the act of eating all of it.
  2. Plan Fitness – With limited time, shopping exhaustion and colder weather, our fitness routines get displaced. Since moving increases your energy, your mood and your metabolism, this is the last thing you want to give up over the holiday season. Instead, make dates with friends to go yoga together rather than getting drinks. Schedule spin class or any classes that you have to pay for if you miss. This is a great incentive to make sure you attend class.
  3. Make a date. Use you daily planner or PDA to schedule all activities, whether it is food shopping, meal prep, exercise or therapy. If it gets scheduled just like any important meeting, you will set the precedent to ensure this activity gets done.
  4. Slow down and Savor – Being a foodie, I know how hard it is not to celebrate with food. However, you can change your mindset of that of your guests too by hosting smaller more intimate holiday parties. Create small intense flavorful meals. Start the meal off with a prayer, a toast or even a moment of silence to allow you and your guests to refocus, create inner calm, and engage in mindful eating.
  5. Use Your Five Senses: Rather than race through your holiday meal and overeat, be sure to use all 5 senses while eating. Smell your food and think about memories the aroma may conjure up. Touch your food; Is your bread hot and crusty or naturally rough with seeds and nuts? Think about the texture and how it makes you feel. Really look at the plate. Is the food presented beautifully? Are there multiple colors on your plate, there should be. Listen to the food, yes listen to see if the turkey’s skin is crispy or the biscotti crunchy. And finally taste your meal!! Many people eat an entire meal and Can never tell you what it really tasted like. They were too busy talking, or shoveling the food in so they could either leave the dinner table or get seconds. This holiday season, be healthy mentally and physically by truly tasting your food and appreciating each bite. A small amount of food tasted will fulfill you more than a few plates of food you never tasted would.

 

 

Boosting Positive Body Image

Take a moment this week to focus more on the positive, forget black and white thinking, and exercise your passion with this inspirational blog post!

Photo Credit: andresAzp via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: andresAzp via Compfight cc

More on the Positive – Instead of focusing on weight, scales or muscles, think about the positive characteristics you possess…humor, creativity, passion. Focusing your positive characteristics can help you build self-esteem and positive body image.

Forget Black and White Thinking – No food is “bad” or “good.” Food provides us with energy and nutrients but in varying amounts. By refraining from labeling foods, we can help prevent ourselves from internalizing those same labels. To learn more about how to foster a healthy habits with food, check out the Healthy Habits Program.

Exercise Your Passion – Do you enjoy swimming, hiking or basketball? Have you ever tried a relaxing yoga session or an upbeat spinning class? Trying a new activity with a friend or simply going hiking with your family can be a great way to socialize and fit in physical activity. Experiment with different activities and find what you enjoy the most. It’s important to exercise for health, wellness and enjoyment rather than just weight loss. For physical activity, think about overall wellbeing rather than pinpointing areas you find negative.

Additional Tips for Boosting Positive Body Image

  1. Surround yourself with positive people
  2. Accept that every shape and body size is beautiful
  3. Understand that the media portrays beauty in varying ways. The media and advertisements project images that are often not realistic.

Weight Shaming is Such a Shame

Weight Shaming is Such a Shame

By Lauren Cohen and Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Photo Credit: ashley rose, via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: ashley rose, via Compfight cc

There are a series of phrases out there so vile that I am embarrassed by the following sentence. They include; “thigh gap,” “food shaming,” “FUPA,” and “butterface.” These are just a few of the grotesque ways we have manipulated the English language to diminish the beauty of another person. A person.  A person who is made of cells, and matter, and muscle, and fibers, and water, and feelings, and emotions, and self-hate. We don’t need your help to belittle ourselves—we do just fine on our own. But we don’t have to.

 

Weight shaming—or perhaps better described as body shaming—is something we all fall victim to. It’s easy to accidentally offend. When I was thirteen, gangly and tall with a rough case of acne, a woman pulled me aside while I was bathing suit shopping. I was in a bikini and she asked me, with a soft and serious tone, if I was eating enough and if I would like her to speak to my mother. I was horrified, confused, and virtually naked. I am sure she had good intentions; but I can still feel today that sensation of brutal exposure.

 

Body shaming is a real life nightmare. It feels like walking into to your high school cafeteria completely nude. The room falls silent and everyone laughs. I don’t need to explain it to you—no doubt you have felt it at one point or another. But… why?

 

It comes from all over. From our parents and our friends, from the media and from ourselves. As a society, we forget that people are built just the way they are built. Everybody is different and every body is different. Sometimes they’re small; sometimes they’re large. Sometimes busty or curvy or lean or petite. There are extremes, of course, and those often require nutrition intervention for both over and under nutrition. But for the majority of the population—we need to work on some serious body loving.

 

There is a theory out there—the set-point theory—arguing that individual bodies maintain a certain weight and frame for extended periods of time. If you think of your lifespan as a graph, this would be a plateau. Provided that the plateau is not in an extreme, I like the idea behind this theory. To me, it is a scientific way of asserting that your body is all your own.

 

Your body is very smart. Think about it. It knows how to take care of itself, when to ask you for more food, when to enforce more sleep, when to suggest an appealing exercise or crave a specific meal. Your body takes care of you—now it’s time for you to take care of your body. Give it some lovin’.

 

 

How do you show your body love? What can we do to help prevent body shaming?

 

“Shattered Image”: An Interview with Brian Cuban

“Shattered Image”: An Interview with Brian Cuban
By Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE, CEDRD and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Screen shot 2013-10-06 at 4.09.10 PM

Weight Stigma Awareness week just passed and Laura joined her iaedp NY team at NEDA’s walk for eating disorder awareness this past Sunday. To continue raising awareness, here at EALM we are sharing a very honest and intimate interview with Brian Cuban, lawyer, author of Shattered Image, and brave individual who is sharing his own story of body dysmorphia.


1) How old were you when you realized that you suffered from BDD (Body Dysmorphic Disorder)? And could you describe what BDD is, from a patient’s perspective?

I was in my 40’s before I knew [BDD] had a name. While the disorder has been around for 100 years, BDD has really only been studied “mainstream” in the last decade. From my personal perspective, it was exaggerating the size of my stomach, love handles and the loss of hair on my head to the point where it affected my ability to function and caused me to engage in self-destructive behaviors.

2) The documented number of men with eating disorders is increasing. Why do you think this is? Do you think our society and the field is offering more resources for men to seek support?

I think it’s because more men are coming forward and being diagnosed because of increased awareness. The increase in awareness makes it easier for a guy to not be consumed by gender stereotypes and stigma and be honest with his treatment provider or other trusted person. There are absolutely more resources. When I first started going through it in the early eighties there was virtually no awareness nor were there resources. I didn’t even know the words anorexia or bulimia existed.

3) Where does bullying fit in the “eating disorder and BDD spectrum”? Would you say bullying was a trigger for your EDO and BDD? Or is there a way to describe to readers how all of these: EDO, BDD, and Poly-substance abuse are all likely to fall in the same bucket?

Bullying is definitely one of the things that played a major role in the development of my eating disorder, especially when that bullying was related to appearance.  It was certainly that way for me. Can I say it was the only reason? No. There was also fat shaming at home. I was also a very shy and withdrawn child genetically. It is possible there was a pre-disposition to such behavior for me.

I started with a distorted image in the mirror. In my mind, if I could change that image to what, I equated, as something that would cause me to be accepted, then everything would be ok. For me, that was being thin at first. When eating behaviors did not work to change the image, I cycled into alcohol and drug abuse, and, eventually, steroid addiction.  I call it a “BDD Behavior Wheel” -constantly spinning with no end game until I addressed the core issues of the fat shaming and bullying I experienced as a child.

4) As a man who has suffered from an eating disorder, in what ways could an eating disorder impact a man’s life that may differ from a woman? (If any).

Gender specific health issues aside, I think the impact is probably the same from a social and day-to-day standpoint. Shame, isolation, health, and impaired achievement affect both men and women with eating disorders. It is society that views them differently. From a male’s “going through it’ standpoint, I suspect much is the same for both sexes.

5) Do you have any advice for moms and dads raising boys or what to look for in terms of signs that their son may be developing a negative relationship with food and body?

I try not to take the role of a treatment provider since I am not one. I can only speak for my behaviors. These are the behaviors I engaged in: trips to the bathroom with water and/or the shower turned on to hide purging, evidence of purging in the bathroom, scraped/bruised finger joints from purging, and eating tiny portions. I was eating less, staying below a specific number of calories per day. Depression, isolation and social withdrawal are big ones. Children don’t isolate themselves without a reason, something is wrong.

6) In addition to genetics and other environmental stimuli, what role do you think nutrition played in the development of your eating disorder and BDD? Was there a message of health versus thin in your house and if so how do you think this affected the ED/BDD?

Nutrition played a role in that it was something I had no context for. Healthy eating was not really something that was a huge topic of discussion in the early 1970’s. I honestly can’t remember whether it was a topic of discussion in my home. I think my parents did the best they could to provide a healthy food environment within the constraints of awareness of that era. I can say that I tended to not eat healthy because it soothed my loneliness and depression in the moment. This typically occurred during lunch and during the day.

7) In terms of eating – do you now practice intuitive eating, mindful eating and/or how would you generally describe your nutrition intake?

Currently I would say that I practice intuitive eating but, I have to admit, I go through yo-yo phases like many others. I actually consulted a nutritionist about a year or so ago and did pretty well with it, but I have gotten away from healthy/balanced eating more than I would like recently. It’s nothing that ties into my disorder in itself, its just life although when I gain weight because of it that can have an effect on how my BDD thoughts play out.

8) Do you have any words of wisdom to share with adolescents who may be struggling with similar issues?

You are not alone and you are loved.  Find a trusted person you can confide in. There is an end game of recovery and a great life if you can drop the wall of shame and self protection for one second and take one tiny step forward by confiding in those who love and care about you.  Don’t wait 27 years like I did. Do it now.

Shattered Image - BCuban

One of our lucky subscribers will receive a free copy of Brian’s book, Shattered Image!

First be sure you have subscribed to EALM and then you can submit more than one entry by doing any of the following.  Be sure to leave an additional comment letting us know you subscribed and liked us! Good luck!

  • Leave a comment here and  “Like us” on our Facebook page
  • Follow @MomDishesItOut and tweet “@MomDishesItOut is having a #Giveaway”

Giveaway ends on Sunday, October 20th, 2013 at 6:00PM EST.

10 Foods to Help You Fuel Your Day

Has your stomach ever rumbled in anticipation of the next meal, even though it may seem like you’ve just eaten a meal or snack? Despite the timing of your meals and snacks, a growling stomach is your body’s way of telling you to grab a bite! Wondering how to stave off hunger and keep those hunger pangs away? A major key to maintaining energy throughout the day and obtaining adequate nutrition to fuel your body and brain is to eat foods that digest slowly. Read on to learn more about the physiological process behind why your stomach growls, and a few key foods that will help keep you feeling fuller, longer!

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Why Does Your Stomach Growl?

So, what’s the cause of the growling sensation? During the digestion process, the food you eat enters your stomach, and is later pushed through your intestinal tract. But before it enters the intestines, the stomach first churns and mashes the food. This process is aided by the walls of the stomach, which are muscular and constantly contract to help circulate the digestive juices. When your stomach is empty, these juices slosh around your stomach; the combination of the gases in your stomach and walls of your stomach contracting..generates the familiar growling sound we hear when we feel hungry.

10 Foods to Help You Feel Fuller, Longer

If you focus on eating less, you may find yourself feeling hungry. Rather than eating less, shift your focus on choosing foods that are naturally high in fiber, are a lean source of protein and low glycemic carbohydrates. Incorporate foods that keep blood sugar levels stable and give consistent energy throughout the day. This can help prevent fatigue, headaches, or midday crashes. Note that simple carbohydrates (like cookies, or white pasta) digest quickly and cause blood sugar levels to spike higher than a complex carbohydrate (like legumes or whole wheat pasta) and then drop quickly. Remember, thhough there are no “good” foods or “bad” foods, be mindful of what foods may be a better option to eat during meal times so that you don’t find yourself feeling hungry soon after. Yes..there are certain foods that promote satiety more than others! This way, you’ll still be able to enjoy the foods you like and stave off hunger!

2 Egg White and One Egg Yolk – Adding the one yolk will help to satiate you in the morning. The combination of fat and protein takes longer for the body to break down, therefore helping you feel fuller longer.

Oats – This soluble fiber will expand in your body and help you feel more full.

Lentils – This low glycemic carb is high in fiber and protein. This combination doesn’t raise your blood sugar.

Whole Wheat Pasta – Many people think you need a low-carb diet but the average adult needs at least 135g carbohydrates a day. This is a great way to stave off hunger as long as you pair it with a protein and a fat.

Kale Salad With its fibrous leaves and crunchy stems, kale takes longer to chew, which slows down your eating and gives your body time to gauge how full you are. To create a salad that will help keep you fuller longer, be sure to pair this fibrous green with a fat like sliced almonds for crunch.

Salmon – Fatty fish like salmon contain omega-3 fatty acids and provides ample amounts of lean protein, which as a fat and protein combination takes longer to digest. The fat is very palatable on the tongue so its great for people who are looking for a food to pair with greens and whole grains.

Low-Fat Greek Yogurt – Creamy and tangy, Greek yogurt is a rich source of calcium, low in sugar and high in protein. It helps slow the digestion of other carbs during your meal. It does not negatively affect blood sugar or zap your energy like a regular yogurt might. Enjoy it on its own, mix with wheat berries and a dash of cinnamon, or simply top with fresh fruit.

Olive Oil- Not only does this healthy fat help us to feel full, but also research shows that those who follow the Mediterranean diet are associated with having a smaller waistline.

Hydrate with H20 – Increase your water intake by consuming a glass before, during or after your meal. Often, people can mistake hunger for thirst, which leads to people eating when they are actually not hungry. Drinking water throughout the day and during meals can fill up your stomach and help you feel satiated.

Chia Seeds – Chia seeds are an excellent source of fiber (~10g in 2 tablespoons) and expand in the body to help you feel more sated. With a neutral flavor, these seeds can be added to almost any dish. They are rich in polyunsaturated fats, especially omega-3 fatty acids (ALA). Sprinkle over steel cut oatmeal or low-fat Greek yogurts, or mix into nut butters or blend into smoothies.

For more foods that may help keep you fuller, longer, check out Laura Cipullo’s tips here.

How to Eat Your Water and Stay Hydrated

No matter what time of the year it is, staying hydrated is important. Remember, the human body is composed of about 70% of water weight! This means that water plays a major role in maintaining our bodily functions, including removing waste and toxins, maintaining body temperature, and preventing dehydration.

During the summer months however, the heat makes it all the more important for you to stay hydrated. Whether or not you’re physically active, you lose water everyday. This occurs through urination, bowel movements, and sweating. To prevent dehydration, supply your body with water throughout the day. The current recommended total daily intake of fluids is 13 cups for men and 9 cups for women.

Look out for the signs of dehydration:

  • Thirst!
  • Dry/Sticky mouth
  • Confusion/Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Low or no urine output; urine looks dark yellow

Good News: H20 Isn’t the Only Way to Stay Hydrated

When you’re thirsty, water can be one of your best bets. If that doesn’t quench your thirst, it turns out that many of the foods we eat contain water but in various amounts. In fact, according to The Institute of Medicine, the average individual’s water intake from food is about 20%. To help meet your daily fluid requirements, try incorporating foods with high water content into meals or as snacks. High water content foods like vegetables and fruits not only help you stay hydrated, but these key foods contain nutritients, minerals, fiber and antioxidants.

If you’re concerned about your H20 intake, here’s a list of our favorite top hydrating foods:

  • Watermelon 
  • Cantaloupe
  • Citrus fruits
  • Tomatoes
  • Pineapples
  • Strawberries
  • Watermelon
  • Lettuce
  • Broccoli
  • Cucumbers 
  • Celery
  • Spinach
  • Apples
  • Greek yogurt or Kefir
  • Bananas
  • Grapes

Healthy in the Mind and the Body

You want to be healthy in the mind as well as the body, right? So do you think a gym is a place of healthy attitudes and positive role models? Unfortunately, it’s not always the best place for our mind or bodies especially when we are moving for the wrong reasons. Many times, I encourage my clients to move but fear they will get caught up in over-working their bodies, or triggered when their trainer or instructor give unsolicited diet advice or encourages more than one spin class a day. Well my colleague had the brilliant idea to create a training program to educate fitness specialists/trainers at the gym how to work with health seekers in a way that honors both the mind and body. This amazing training helps the gym employees to identify individuals with eating disorders and gives them tools to work with clients in a healthy way rather than encouraging the disorder. Read on to learn about Jodi’s Destructively Fit and perhaps think about whether or not your health club needs a little bit of Jodi’s energy.

By Guest Blogger, Jodi Rubin

Eating disorders have always been my passion. They have been my specialty since I began my LCSW private practice more than a decade ago. Over the years, I’ve directed a program for eating disorders, currently teach a curriculum I created on eating disorders at NYU’s Graduate School of Social Work, and have done a few other things. Yet, I have not found a way to connect my love of healthy fitness and honoring one’s body with my passion for helping those struggling with eating disorders.

The issue of eating disorders within fitness centers is a ubiquitous one. I’ve seen people spending hours on the treadmill, heard countless patients recounting their obsessiveness with the gym, and others seeming as though their self-esteem became immediately deflated if they couldn’t work out hard enough, fast enough or long enough. The research I have done has revealed that the presence of eating disorders within fitness centers is “sticky” and “complicated” and gets very little attention. Through no fault of anyone in particular, if people aren’t given the education and tools, then how can anyone feel knowledgable and confident enough to address this sensitive issue?

I went directly to fitness professionals to see what they thought about eating disorders within the fitness industry. As I suspected, it was clear that there was not a lack of interest in this issue. Quite the contrary. Most, if not all, of those with whom I spoke were eager and excited to finally have a forum in which they could learn about eating disorders and how to approach the issue. That’s when DESTRUCTIVELY FIT™: demystifying eating disorders for fitness professionals™ was born. I created this 3-hour training with the goal of educating those within the fitness industry about what eating disorders are and what to do if they notice that someone may be struggling. It has since been endorsed for continuing education by both the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) and The American Council on Exercise (ACE) and has sparked the interest of variety of fitness clubs. Check out Destructively Fit™ in the news here!

Some stats for you…
• 25 million American women are struggling with eating disorders
• 7 million American men are struggling with eating disorders
• 81% of 10 year old girls are afraid of being fat
• 51% of 9-10 year old girls feel better about themselves when they are dieting
• 45% of boys are unhappy with their bodies
• 67% of women 15-64 withdraw from life-engaging activities, like giving an opinion and going to the doctor, because they feel badly about their looks
• An estimated 90-95% of those diagnosed with eating disorders are members of fitness centers

 

Read more about Destructively Fit™ on destructivelyfit.com. You can also follow Destructively Fit™ on Facebook and Twitter. Help spread the word and be a part of affecting change!