The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

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The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

Teaching Food Waste and Hunger without Worrying Your Child

Teaching Food Waste and Hunger without Worrying Your Child

In the springtime, a mother asked me, “How do I teach my child about food waste and hunger without worrying or shaming her?” Well, I didn’t have the answer, but I now have a way to at least start the conversation. In honor of Hunger Action Month, read on to learn about nutrition student and Rescuing Leftover Cuisine volunteer Hannah Husby’s recommendations to turn extra food into meals for others. –Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE, CEDRD and Mom

Photo Credit: jbloom via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: jbloom via Compfight cc

Ideas for Food Rescue Hannah Husby, Nutrition Student, NYU   While we worry a lot these days about all the food we are eating, we should consider turning our positive attention to food we may be wasting. Of course, everyone wastes food from time to time; it’s easy to want to buy all the beautiful produce at the farmer’s market, only to find you bought too many peaches—and the last two became rotten before you could eat them! (For tips on how to avoid this, see this post.) This waste tends to be more annoying than anything for us, but for those that face issues with food insecurity, having that peach before it gets soft could make a difference between going to bed hungry or not. Short of eating everything in your fridge right now so none of it goes to waste, what can be done to help? It actually takes a surprisingly small amount of time to make a difference. Big cities across the country can use help feeding their homeless and secure food, and this can make an incredible impact. Here are a few places to check out in New York City:

City Harvest – Known for everything from food rescue to nutrition education, City Harvest has served New York for over thirty years and continues to eliminate food waste every day.

Rescuing Leftover Cuisine – A smaller and recently created non-profit, Rescuing Leftover Cuisine also aims to feed the hungry by taking donations from restaurants and businesses, no matter how small, and can always use volunteers to transport this food directly to shelters and pantries.

Food rescues can also be found all over the country by checking out Feeding America, but if there are no rescues in your community, you can actually create your own with the help of City Harvest!   Volunteering, even just an hour or two a week, can do wonders not only for the community you live in, but also for yourself, connecting you more with those around you and creating a fresh perspective on those day-to-day complaints we all face. And it certainly helps you appreciate how wonderfully delicious those peaches are!

10 Foods to Help You Fuel Your Day

Has your stomach ever rumbled in anticipation of the next meal, even though it may seem like you’ve just eaten a meal or snack? Despite the timing of your meals and snacks, a growling stomach is your body’s way of telling you to grab a bite! Wondering how to stave off hunger and keep those hunger pangs away? A major key to maintaining energy throughout the day and obtaining adequate nutrition to fuel your body and brain is to eat foods that digest slowly. Read on to learn more about the physiological process behind why your stomach growls, and a few key foods that will help keep you feeling fuller, longer!

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Why Does Your Stomach Growl?

So, what’s the cause of the growling sensation? During the digestion process, the food you eat enters your stomach, and is later pushed through your intestinal tract. But before it enters the intestines, the stomach first churns and mashes the food. This process is aided by the walls of the stomach, which are muscular and constantly contract to help circulate the digestive juices. When your stomach is empty, these juices slosh around your stomach; the combination of the gases in your stomach and walls of your stomach contracting..generates the familiar growling sound we hear when we feel hungry.

10 Foods to Help You Feel Fuller, Longer

If you focus on eating less, you may find yourself feeling hungry. Rather than eating less, shift your focus on choosing foods that are naturally high in fiber, are a lean source of protein and low glycemic carbohydrates. Incorporate foods that keep blood sugar levels stable and give consistent energy throughout the day. This can help prevent fatigue, headaches, or midday crashes. Note that simple carbohydrates (like cookies, or white pasta) digest quickly and cause blood sugar levels to spike higher than a complex carbohydrate (like legumes or whole wheat pasta) and then drop quickly. Remember, thhough there are no “good” foods or “bad” foods, be mindful of what foods may be a better option to eat during meal times so that you don’t find yourself feeling hungry soon after. Yes..there are certain foods that promote satiety more than others! This way, you’ll still be able to enjoy the foods you like and stave off hunger!

2 Egg White and One Egg Yolk – Adding the one yolk will help to satiate you in the morning. The combination of fat and protein takes longer for the body to break down, therefore helping you feel fuller longer.

Oats – This soluble fiber will expand in your body and help you feel more full.

Lentils – This low glycemic carb is high in fiber and protein. This combination doesn’t raise your blood sugar.

Whole Wheat Pasta – Many people think you need a low-carb diet but the average adult needs at least 135g carbohydrates a day. This is a great way to stave off hunger as long as you pair it with a protein and a fat.

Kale Salad With its fibrous leaves and crunchy stems, kale takes longer to chew, which slows down your eating and gives your body time to gauge how full you are. To create a salad that will help keep you fuller longer, be sure to pair this fibrous green with a fat like sliced almonds for crunch.

Salmon – Fatty fish like salmon contain omega-3 fatty acids and provides ample amounts of lean protein, which as a fat and protein combination takes longer to digest. The fat is very palatable on the tongue so its great for people who are looking for a food to pair with greens and whole grains.

Low-Fat Greek Yogurt – Creamy and tangy, Greek yogurt is a rich source of calcium, low in sugar and high in protein. It helps slow the digestion of other carbs during your meal. It does not negatively affect blood sugar or zap your energy like a regular yogurt might. Enjoy it on its own, mix with wheat berries and a dash of cinnamon, or simply top with fresh fruit.

Olive Oil- Not only does this healthy fat help us to feel full, but also research shows that those who follow the Mediterranean diet are associated with having a smaller waistline.

Hydrate with H20 – Increase your water intake by consuming a glass before, during or after your meal. Often, people can mistake hunger for thirst, which leads to people eating when they are actually not hungry. Drinking water throughout the day and during meals can fill up your stomach and help you feel satiated.

Chia Seeds – Chia seeds are an excellent source of fiber (~10g in 2 tablespoons) and expand in the body to help you feel more sated. With a neutral flavor, these seeds can be added to almost any dish. They are rich in polyunsaturated fats, especially omega-3 fatty acids (ALA). Sprinkle over steel cut oatmeal or low-fat Greek yogurts, or mix into nut butters or blend into smoothies.

For more foods that may help keep you fuller, longer, check out Laura Cipullo’s tips here.

A Day at the Beach: So What’s for Lunch?

With school out and warm weather, it can only mean one thing… it’s time to hit the beach!

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As bathing suits, towels, sunscreen, cameras, shovels, and pails are being carefully packed up, lunch is usually thrown together at the last minute and sometimes leading to unhealthy food choices. Along with trying to make the healthiest choices, you also have to consider which foods are the safest to bring to the beach and which ones should probably be left at home. But don’t worry, we are here to make packing lunch for the beach a little easier!

In order to make a quick lunch that still tastes good, some planning must be involved. What kinds of foods do your friends and family enjoy? What foods should you leave at home so that you can avoid food contamination at the beach? What foods are the most nutritious and will help keep everyone satisfied and fueled for the day?

Food Safety at the Beach
When considering food safety, many things come to mind but with the addition of the sand and the sun of the beach, food safety takes on a whole new meaning. The biggest thing to consider when it comes to beach safety is the steaming hot temperature. When you combine foods that need to be chilled with the blazing hot sun, things do not end well. According to the FDA’s Qualitative Risk Assessment, once intact fruits and vegetables, such as melons and tomatoes, are cut and protective barriers are open, microorganisms can grow more easily. Once heat and humidity are introduced, the rate at which bacteria grow increases significantly. Therefore, it is best to bring whole fruits and vegetables to the beach. Some ideas for whole fruits and vegetables are oranges, grapes, cherries, strawberries, blueberries, peaches, grape tomatoes, carrots, celery, and raw broccoli. If you decide to bring fruits or vegetables that need to be cut or sliced, it is safer if you do so while you are at the beach. Bringing proper utensils to cut/slice these foods will make it a lot easier. For example, bringing an apple core to slice an apple or a pear is easy. Also, using a knife to slice veggies such as cucumbers or peppers is also quick and simple! Make sure you are storing these foods in appropriate containers and at cool temperatures to keep them fresh before you cut them! Prevent sand from touching the food and fruit juices from leaking; use a lockable container like Sistema or Black+Blum.

Another food that should be avoided at the beach is undercooked chicken, fish, or meat as well as different kinds of “salads”. Not only do these kinds of foods allow for a large number of food borne illnesses, but they also can cause cross contamination with other foods. A research study that appeared in Letters in Applied Microbiology, has recently suggested that Salmonella (one of the most common food borne pathogens) contaminates raw/undercooked chicken and meat products at the highest rates over the summer. Also, different chicken salads, egg salads, and tuna salads can cause cross contamination due to the mayonnaise, if they are not chilled to the correct temperature. These different kinds of “salads” containing mayonnaise can still be enjoyed if they are transported and kept at the appropriate temperature. Foods containing mayonnaise must be stored at 45 deg F or lower. To be sure of this, use freezer gel packs to keep food and beverages cold and at a safe temperature.
These types of foods should be stored in containers that can be kept cold such as Kangovou, which is made from food grade stainless steel.

When keeping food safety in mind at the beach, it is also important to consider how you are going to transport and eat your lunch. It is important to pack your food in a cooler with ice (or ice packs) so that the food stays cold and fresh. Also, finger foods tend to be the easiest for the beach and help to avoid “sandy” lunches, so think whole fruits and sandwiches! Don’t forget to wash any fresh produce you pack with you!

So, what are 5 safe and healthy lunches to bring to the beach?

1. Whole-wheat bread with natural peanut butter and banana – The bread won’t get soggy and the peanut butter and banana will give you fuel for hours!

2. Whole-wheat pita with grilled chicken and veggies with hummus –Pack celery and raw broccoli florets to dip in hummus. Single-serve hummus packs are a great way to eat more healthfully and to enjoy finger foods!

3. Whole wheat crackers with low-fat cheese and a handful of grapes or cherries, and carrots or celery sticks – Having a variety of food can make lunch at the beach fun and make it feel like a picnic!

4. Whole-wheat wrap with lean turkey or lean ham with veggies and homemade trail mix (dried fruit, cereal, and nuts) – Homemade trail mix is a fun and healthy way to eat some of your favorite foods!

5. Grilled chicken sandwich on a whole-wheat bun with dark lettuce – pile more veggies on your sandwich for more flavor!

Don’t forget about snacks! To keep everyone satisfied and happy, think about quick and healthy snacks such as whole fruits, veggie sticks with low fat dip/hummus, homemade trail mix, whole grain granola bars, and popcorn. And don’t forget to pack plenty of water!

References
Scott J (2012). DRAFT Qualitative Risk Assessment Risk of Activity/Food Combinations for Activities
(Outside the Farm Defintion) Conducted in a Facility Co-Located on a Farm. Center for Food Safety
and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Adminstration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ,
1-95.
Zdragas, A K Mazaraki, G Vafeas, V Giantzi, & T Papadopoulos (2012). Prevalence, seasonal
occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella in poultry retail products in Greece.. Letters in
Applied Microbiology, 55(4). retrieved May 31, 2013, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22943611