The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

LLC badge

The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.







EALM Product Review: Garden Lites Muffins

EALM Product Review:

Garden Lites Carrot Berry Muffins

These muffins are so tasty, even my picky eater approves of them!

Photo Courtesy of Garden Lites
Photo Courtesy of Garden Lites

With the most delicious taste accented by blueberries, everyone will love these adorable little muffins. The first ingredient is carrots so that is an obvious thumbs up. The second is egg whites so another thumbs up. And the third, a gluten free flour blend that contains brown rice, and flaxseed meal. Screen shot 2014-12-15 at 2.00.46 PMThis is a great snack option for kids. Especially those who need to consume more veggies. Plus, they’re allergy-friendly and make a great snack for parents!

How to Get Your Nanny to Follow Your Food Style

Guest Blog by Debra Johnson

Photo Credit: Ioannis Karydis via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Ioannis Karydis via Compfight cc

Many children have special dietary needs that are a result of either a specific lifestyle or a health condition. A child may have an allergy to a specific food, or a family may have chosen to live a vegetarian lifestyle. No matter the reasoning for a special diet, leaving a child with a new caregiver or nanny can be a challenging experience for a parent. It can cause the parent to worry about how well the nanny will follow the child’s diet plan. For this reason, the following ideas are offered to help you teach your nanny the importance of following your child’s food style when you leave your child in their care.
1. Create a contract – When hiring a nanny, it is always a good idea to write up a simple contract that details the hours that they will work as well as other necessary guidelines. For a child who has a special diet, this can be outlined in the contract as well so that everyone understands how important it is for the diet to be followed.

2. Post a menu – Until a new nanny becomes accustomed to the child’s diet, it can be helpful to create a menu of meals for the nanny to follow. This can be posted in a visible area of the kitchen or in a manual that you create for the nanny.

3. Make it convenient – If a child’s diet is complicated, it could become overwhelming for a nanny at first. Therefore, it is a good idea to prepare meals ahead of time that can be frozen and reheated. Additionally, stocking up on approved foods and snacks will help your nanny to include a variety of healthy options for your child.

4. Avoid eating out – Spending a day out can be an enjoyable way for your nanny to provide your child with new experiences. However, navigating the menu at a restaurant can be challenging for someone who has special dietary needs. For this reason, you may prefer to pack a lunch or provide a list of safe food options for days when your nanny takes your child out on a day trip.

5. Post emergency information – Parents should also be sure to leave emergency information with a nanny. This is especially true for children with allergies who may require special medications in the event that they have a reaction. Make sure that your nanny has access to emergency information so that she can act quickly if necessary.

When it comes to special accommodations, a qualified nanny will have no problem making sure that your child’s needs are met. However, it is important to provide support to your nanny by making sure  they understand your child’s health condition and have access to the proper food. By making an extra effort to ensure that your nanny is knowledgeable, you will be able to enjoy the peace that comes with knowing they will provide your child with the best of care.


About the Author:

This guest post is contributed by Debra Johnson, blogger and editor of She welcomes your comments at her email,

A Reflection on BMI | Part 2 – BMI Report Cards

A Reflection on BMI: Part 2 BMI Report Cards
By Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Screen shot 2014-06-07 at 11.59.22 PM

Just to recap what we learned in Part I, BMI is a measurement based on an individual’s height and weight. It is used on a scale to reflect one’s status as underweight, normal and underweight. While using measurements is essential for statistical reasons and diagnostic tools, BMI is being utilized as a marker of health rather than focusing on behaviors and a cluster of measurements. We have said it before and will say it again; BMI is only one measurement and it’s not always reflective of a person’s state of health.


After collecting all of this information on BMI, does this change how we look at it for our growing children and adolescents?


Adolescent bodies, the time of development just after childhood, are growing at a rapid pace. Mentally and physically. Teens deal with an increased level of hormones in their bodies, which contribute to the many different growth spurts they will endure. They struggle with self-identity and the desire for independence. This combination often causes teens to be deeply self-conscious, which can inhibit decision-making. It could cause them to become defiant and often times unresponsive to parental guidance.


Puberty arrives at different times, stages and intervals for every child but usually happens around age 11-14. On average, teens experience a 20-25% growth increase during this time—35 pounds for girls and 45 pounds for boys. In an average one-year spurt, girls grow roughly 3.5 inches and boys about 4 inches. Using a measurement such as BMI, which is already so marginalized to determine the health status of a rapidly changing youth seems counterproductive.

Screen shot 2014-06-07 at 11.53.57 PM

Over the past few years, you may have heard of BMI Report Cards or, as they are more harshly referred to, “Fat Letters.” They are letters sent home from schools reporting on a child’s BMI and suggesting to seek out a physician if results are above normal. Needless to say, parents did not respond well to this. It caused a national outrage. In 2004, Arkansas was the first state to send BMI report cards home to parents and/or guardians. Children and adolescents with a BMI indicating they were “overweight” were suggested to consult a health care professional. Today, the program is implemented in over a quarter of United States school districts.


A cover story from the New York Post last week chronicled (with pictures!) this same concern. Click here to read the article in full and see the letter that a young girl was sent home with from the NY Department of Education. Unfortunately, this is happening with more regularity in New York City schools than the article chronicled. It isn’t just front cover news; a friend of ours recently received “obese” range marks for two of her three children who are nowhere near overweight. Now it becomes clear that we cannot possible classify these kids as overweight or underweight without taking into consideration other factors such as fat distribution, family history and the child’s behavior. This leads us to a very important question—if BMI calculates the relationship between height and weight, in a time when height and weight are rapidly changing at different paces and intervals, how can we justify using this as a determinant of adolescent health?


Knowing everything that we know about BMI, is this really something that will be beneficial for children and adolescents? Shouldn’t we be focusing on their habits through this time to pave the way for a lifelong positive relationship with health and food?


Perhaps even more important, we should be considering how these letters impact the children receiving them. We know that adolescence is the time that individuals are molded into adults. So what happens when a child is told they are fat? A recent article published by the LA Times discusses a study at UCLA that researched this question. Their data reflects “10-year-old girls who are told they are too fat by people that are close to them are more likely to be obese at 19 than girls who were never told they were too fat.” (LA Times, Deborah Netburn) The research goes on to emphasize the danger of “Weight Labeling” at this age. With our understanding of adolescent development, it’s easy to see why.


The major flaw with BMI calculations continues to be that it cannot tell you an individual’s habits. Those high in muscle weight are considered overweight, petite individuals are underweight and normal range individuals could be harboring unhealthy eating habits. BMI is limiting. It doesn’t ask the big questions; have you started menstruating? Are you feeling pressure to experiment with drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, or sex? How often do you think about food? Are you eating a balanced diet? These are the thoughts and habits that, overtime, determine the health of an individual.


Has your child received a BMI report card known as a Fitness Gram? What are your feelings concerning weight stigmas and children?


For more information on this subject, check out the Academy of Eating Disorder’s stand on BMI reporting in schools and Examiner’s take on Fitnessgrams.

Mommies Nutrition Made Easy For Mother’s Day

Photo Credit: bies via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: bies via Compfight cc

Mommies Nutrition Made Easy For Mother’s Day
By Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Pregnancy is both an exciting and life-changing experience. Your body undergoes many changes and with pregnancy lasting approximately 38 to 40 weeks, EALM thought it would be helpful to give pregnant moms three easy to follow daily nutrition samples.


Just So Know:


An additional 25 grams or more of daily protein is needed while pregnant. The extra protein is essential in helping your baby grow while in utero.

Screen shot 2014-05-09 at 9.44.22 PM

Eating for Smart Minds

Among the nutrients needed during pregnancy, DHA and EPA – essential fatty acids are of utmost importance. DHA and EPA are associated with brain development and better vision in children. The body cannot make these nutrients so eat up! (Just be sure to not exceed an intake of 3 grams per day while pregnant1.


Building Strong Bones

Calcium is a vital nutrient to consume during pregnancy. It is currently recommended that pregnant mothers ingest 1,000 mg of calcium daily to maintain optimal stores for both her and baby1.

Screen shot 2014-05-09 at 9.43.48 PM

Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. It is recommended that pregnant mothers consume 600 IUs of Vitamin D per day.  Vitamin D is found naturally in few foods such as, fatty fish and eggs but is often fortified in foods such as milk, yogurt and even orange juice.

Screen shot 2014-05-09 at 9.48.01 PM


Importance of Folic Acid3 

Folic acid is an essential B vitamin in pregnancy. It helps prevent premature delivery and birth defects such as spina bifida. It is recommended pregnant moms get 600 mcg Folic acid per day.

Screen shot 2014-05-09 at 9.43.35 PM

Photo Credit: visualpanic via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: visualpanic via Compfight cc

What About Coffee?

Drinking 1-2 cups of coffee per day is safe during pregnancy. Phew!!

Here are 3 days of meals adequate in calories, calcium, protein, and necessary nutrients, broken into the three trimesters. (Please click on each plan for a larger viewing size)

Screen shot 2014-05-10 at 10.18.12 PM Screen shot 2014-05-10 at 10.17.52 PM Screen shot 2014-05-10 at 10.12.24 PM



1. Brown, Judith E., and Janet S. Isaacs. Nutrition through the Life Cycle. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, CENGAGE Learning, 2011. Print.

2. “Vitamin D.” — Health Professional Fact Sheet. National Institutes of Health, 24 June 2011. Web. 10 May 2014.

3. “Folate.” — QuickFacts. National Institutes of Health, 23 Apr. 2013. Web. 10 May 2014.

Contrary to Popular Belief – Men, Also Suffer From Eating Disorders

Contrary to Popular Belief – Men, Also Suffer From Eating Disorders
By: Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Many people believe that the majority of individuals with eating disorders are female. However, recent studies are showing that this is not the case. Males, also, suffer from eating disorders. In fact, the amount of men facing an eating disorder may surprise you.

The National Institute of Mental Health has determined that an estimated 1 million men struggle with eating disorders or roughly 1 in 10 eating disorder patients is a male1. Researchers believe this suggests, not only that the incidence of male eating disorders is increasing, but the amount of men seeking treatment is also rising2.

Screen shot 2013-09-23 at 12.13.31 PM

A recent report featured in the Journal of Men’s Health and Gender found that a frequent behavior among males with eating disorders is a term called “Anorexia Athleticism,” or extreme and frequent exercise3. It is typical to see male eating disorder patients use excessive exercise to make up for their eating habits or on the other hand, exercising without enough food intake, resulting in possible starvation or Anorexia. Andrew Walen, LCSW-C, a psychotherapist specializing in male eating disorders, states that eating disorders can also stem from childhood bullying (A. Walen, LCSW-C, phone communication, September 2013). For example, a young boy who is bullied because of his weight may be prone to dieting to feel accepted by his peers. This can be a slippery slope that could potentially lead to an eating disorder.

According to NEDA, boys’ and men’s body images are formed by the “attitudes and beliefs that culture attributes to the meaning of masculinity, including the traits of independence, competitiveness,
strength, and aggressiveness. Those who do not conform to the culture’s ideal image tend to have a
lower self-esteem than those who do conform. When males fail to live up to these masculine expectations,
they feel emotionally isolated, and this leads to problem behaviors. These problem behaviors may take
the form of eating disordered beliefs and behaviors”4.

John F. Morgan, the author of The Invisible Man: A Self Help Guide for Men with Eating Disorders, Compulsive Exercise, and Bigorexia, states that if left untreated, male eating disorders can affect aspects of the man’s life, such as “interference with their work, social activities, or just meeting day-to-day responsibilities”5. “While the effects of an eating disorder don’t differ dramatically between males and females,” Andrew Walen explains, “males typically experience a deeper feeling of shame.” The male psyche has an “I can handle it” mentality and admitting the need for help can be difficult for men. There is often a sense of isolation for men, even in recovery (phone communication, September 2013).The good news is that the amount of resources for males with eating disorders is beginning to change with the increasing level of awareness.

Study authors, Kearney-Cooke and Steichen-Asch, state that in our modern day culture “muscular build, overt physical aggression, competence at athletics, competitiveness, and independence” are desirable traits for males, while, “dependency passivity, inhibition of physical aggression, smallness, and neatness” are often viewed as more appropriate for females6. Here at EALM, we encourage families to be very cautious and not fall prey to furthering this type of categorizing and or stereotyping of boys and girls. We ask parents to educate yourselves on eating disorder warning signs that your sons may exhibit.

Possible Warning Signs of EDO Young Boys:

  • Experienced a negative reaction to their bodies from their peers at a young age6.
  • Tendency to share a closer relationship with their mothers, in comparison to their fathers.
  • Dieting in response to being overweight, (whereas females begin to diet because they may “feel” overweight).
  • Likely to manage their weight through exercise and calorie restriction.
  • Fixated on building a muscular “shape,” or a certain look. They are less likely to be fixated on their actual weight on the scale.
  • Participate in the following sports: gymnasts, runners, body builders, rowers, wrestlers, jockeys, dancers, and swimmers. Are particularly vulnerable to eating disorders because their sports necessitate weight restriction. It is important to note that weight loss in an attempt to improve athletic ability differs from an eating disorder when the central psychopathology is absent4.

 In addition to the above signs, there are psychological and biological factors that may also be associated with eating disorders including, but not limited to the following:

  • A lack of coping skills or a lack of control over one’s life
  • Experiencing anxiety, depression, anger, stress, or loneliness
  • Having a family member with an eating disorder

If you feel that you, or a family member, may be suffering from an eating disorder, we’ve provided some suggestions from Andrew Walen:

Screen shot 2013-09-23 at 12.11.15 PM

  • Visit The National Association for Males with Eating Disorders, Inc.
  • Find a male therapist or find a program that understands the male perspective.
  • Get help wherever you can, educate yourself, and be sure to include your family.
  • Lastly, don’t let shame or your eating disorder voice tell you that you aren’t worth it, because you are.

Here are our recommended resources:

National Eating Disorder Association, NEDA

The International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals Foundation, iaedp Foundation

The International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals Foundation of NY, iaedpNY Foundation

The Eating Disorder Referral and Information Center

Diet, Detox, or Disorder – An article featuring Laura Cipullo

Screen shot 2013-09-25 at 1.19.21 PMIf you live in the NYC area, come join us on Sunday, October 6th in a walk to raise awareness of eating disorders at the NYC NEDA Walk. Click here to learn more.



1. Strother, E., Lemberg, R., Stanford, S. C., & Turberville, D. 2012. Eating Disorders in men: Underdiagnosed, undertreated, and Misunderstood. Eating Disorders, 20(5), 346-355.
2. Striegel R.H., Rosselli F., Perrin N., DeBar L., Wilson G.T., May A., and Kraemer, H.C. Gender Difference in the Prevalence of Eating Disorder Symptoms. Intnl J of Eat Dis. 2009; 42.5: 471-474. Available at:
3. Weltzin, T. 2005. Eating disorders in men: Update. Journal of Men’s Health & Gender, 2: 186–193.
4. Shiltz T. Research on Males and Eating Disorders. NEDA. undefined. Available at Accessed September 20, 2013
5. Morgan, J. 2008. The invisible man: A self-help guide for men with eating disorders, compulsive exercise, and bigorexia, New York, NY: Routledge.
6. Kearney-Cooke, A., Steichen-Asch, E. 1990. Men, body image, and eating disorders. Males and Eating Disorders. 54-74.

Chaise23 Fitness Giveaway



Think Pilates chair (aka “chaise”) meets aerobics on 23rd Street in New York City.  It’s one of NYC’s newest fitness studios and doesn’t disappoint! They offer a variety of classes from Ballet Bungee to the Chair Challenge. (You can checkout a description of each of their classes here.) Whether you’re a beginner or an athlete, it’s definitely a fun way to get your heart rate pumping!


When we asked Chaise 23 if they would agree to share a free class with one of our readers, they enthusiastically said “Yes!” So get moving! Comment here for a chance to win 3 free classes at Chaise 23! And don’t forget to say “hi” if you see me there!

What is Chaise23?

Chaise23 is a culmination of Lauren Piskin’s years as a competitive figure skater and over 30 years experience in the fitness industry. As one of the first certified Pilates instructors Lauren has seen it all. Thus Chaise23 and The Reinvention Method was born.

The Reinvention Method:

What is better than a workout that can actually redefine the shape of your body. The Reinvention Method is specifically designed to create a long, lean, and sculpted body. We have fused together the sculpting power of Pilates with aerobics, strength training, and ballet, to create a unique workout specifically designed to target those hard to reach trouble areas (think lower abs, glutes, and under arms). The Method is comprised of two complementary classes – Reinvention Chair and Cardio Chair.



One lucky winner will receive 3 classes at Chaise 23 in New York City!

Enter by one of the following ways. You can submit more than one entry by doing any of the following. Just be sure to leave an additional comment letting us know you did! Good luck!

  • Leave a comment here and  “Like us” on our Facebook page
  • Follow @MomDishesItOut and tweet @MomDishesItOut is having a @Chaise23 #Giveaway
    We’d love to hear about what ways you like to stay physically active and moving!. Giveaway ends on Sunday, June 30th at 6:00 PM EST.

Fun and Easy Outdoor Activities for Father's Day

Screen Shot 2013-06-12 at 10.52.04 AMTo help build healthy habits, center this Father’s Day on fun activities rather than just food. Pick out a few activities that you and your dad can enjoy together. Remember, the best gifts aren’t always bought–Sometimes Dad just wants to spend quality time with his family! June has the perfect summertime weather to fit in some outdoor activities. We’ve gathered a list of fun activities (both indoor and outdoor) to keep you both healthy and happy!

Cycling – Stay moving under the sun for a cool breeze. Cycling isn’t just for those who live in the suburbs…if you live in bustling city like NYC, you’ve probably seen the new Citi bikes. Rent them out for the day and ride along the Hudson Pier or make it an adventure over the Brooklyn Bridge!

Fishing – Grab a fishing pole and head towards the water. This is a relaxing activity to do whether you’re on a boat or sitting by the lake!

Hiking – Whether it’s extreme hiking or climbing up a trail, this will be a great time to connect with your dad. Pack lunches into a backpack and enjoy it with a great view.

Cooking Class – Switch up the focus on food this holiday by getting dad to cook with you! Book a class that teaches how to make foods from his favorite cuisine. This will give Dad an opportunity to pick up some new skills and if he’s already a chef in the kitchen… well, it’ll give him a chance to spice up his skills!

Beach – Nestle your toes in the sand and under the sun by traveling to the beach. Pack a frisbee and football or volleyball and you and the family are sure to have a great time.

Love Your Heart with 8 Heart-Healthy Foods

February isn’t just the month of flowers, chocolates or spending time with the ones you love..but as heart health month, it’s also about loving your heart! Heart disease remains one of the leading causes of death for both men and women1. Lifestyle choices play a major role in preventing heart disease as well as controlling it. With this in mind, it’s never too early to start focusing on overall heart health. Show your heart how much you appreciate it by incorporating these heart healthy foods!

Berries – Please your heart with antioxidant rich berries like strawberries, goji berries and blackberries, which are an antioxidant powerhouse! Blueberries for example, house high amounts of phytonutrients like anthocyanidins, which aid in the process of neutralizing free radical damage in our cells. Consuming 1-2 portions of berries daily may help reduce cardiovascular disease risk2.

Brussel Sprouts – Tender, crunchy and just a little bit nutty, brussel sprouts have more to offer than just flavor. This cruciferous veggie contains vitamin C and vitamin A which help fight against heart disease, and vitamin Its high fiber content aids in digestion, helps lower cholesterol and reduces the risk for developing heart disease, stroke and hypertension3.

Chia Seeds – Chia seeds contain a high level of soluble fiber, which helps slow down digestion and regulates blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber can help lower LDL cholesterol, reduce risk for cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Just three tablespoons of these seeds can provide 37-44% of the American Heart Association’s recommended amount of fiber per day. Two tablespoons of chia seeds provide a 3:1 ratio of omega-3:omega-6 FA. With 3x more omega-3 than omega-6, adding chia seeds to a diet can help an individual reach optimal health by balancing out the ratio of fatty-acid intake in one’s daily nutrition. To learn more about chia seeds, click here.

Collard Greens – This cruciferous veggie is high in vitamins A,C, K and folate. It contains antioxidants and provides us with anti-inflammatory benefits.

Greek Yogurt – Low in saturated fat and cholesterol, Greek yogurt makes for a heart-healthy snack. It’s high in protein and calcium, which can help you stay fuller longer, while strengthening your bones.

Olives – Monounsaturated fats in moderation are heart-healthy fats that help lower blood cholesterol levels4. A rich source of monounsaturated fats is olives, which have been shown to lower LDL (“bad cholesterol”) and increase or maintain HDL (“good cholesterol”).

Salmon – High in omega-3 fatty acid, DHA and protein, salmon helps lower blood pressure and reduces inflammation5.

Wheat germ – Packed with B vitamins, the nutrients found in the grain play a vital role in maintaining heart-healthy bodily functions. In addition to lowering the risk of heart disease, B vitamins like folate are especially for women of childbearing age as well as any woman eating too little veggies or fruits. As an excellent source of fiber, wheat germ helps control cholesterol.

5 Candies That Won't Spook Your Blood Sugar

Or Send Your Children Into A Crazy Tizzy!!



1). Annie’s Organic Orchard Strawberry Fruit Bites

One pack of these fun fruit snacks are a great option for your trick or treating tots!



2) YummyEarth Organic Lollipops

Enjoy 3 lollipops!!

If you want quantity, you can lick three of these pops without worrying about your blood sugar.



3). Tootsie Pop

Want something to crunch and chew?? Choose a tootsie pop.



4). Lindt Chocolate

Fix your chocolate craving with 4 squares of Lindt’s 85% cocoa bar.



5). Hershey’s Chocolate Bar with Almonds

Yes, you can eat a bar of chocolate with almonds. The best option is to eat half of this and save the rest for another day.