The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

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The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.







Get Political: Speak Up About the Proposed New Nutrition Labels and Serving Sizes

Get Political: Speak Up About the Proposed New Nutrition Labels and Serving Sizes 
(A Huffington Post Blog)

Photo Credit: Caden Crawford via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Caden Crawford via Compfight cc

Do you catch yourself staring at the back of packaged foods trying to decipher what the nutrition labels mean? Let’s face it… food labels can be very confusing. Now is our opportunity to have a voice in making changes!

Have you seen the proposals for the new food label? This change would be the first major adjustment since food labels were mandated in the early ’90s. Up to this point, the only modification has been adding trans-fat amounts. The chance to finally update the label gives us an opportunity to help make these labels less puzzling for all of us!

For more of this article and information on the proposed nutrition food labels click here to be redirected to Laura’s article on Huffington Post.

Global Kitchen Cookbook Giveaway!

To honor National Nutrition Month, we wanted to host a giveaway on something we’ve been focusing on over at MomDishesItOut: Global Eating!

Watching the various countries compete in the Olympics last month and watching my kids taste new foods while we traveled in Peru got me thinking about the importance of trying new foods and expanding your eating horizons. So, when our friends at Cooking Light sent us the Global Kitchen Cookbook, I knew I had to share it with my readers.

Written by David Joachim, this cookbook features 150 recipes from all over the globe. Just this past Friday, we featured one of their recipes on our blog: Mom Dishes It Out.

Check out the details on how to win a copy of Cooking Light’s Global Kitchen Cookbook below and be sure to take a peek at the links below for more information on global eating!

Screen shot 2014-03-14 at 10.09.02 PM

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Did you read our blog posts below?

Olympians at the Office

Global Kitchen’s Brown Soda Bread

Dinner Olympics: Challenge your Child’s Palate!

My Trip to Peru:
Pizza Hut Tunes to Pardo’s Chicken…How to eat with your kids while traveling

What Eating Right Means to the Future of Nutrition!

In honor of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic’s National Nutrition Month, we wanted to share our views on eating right. Read what eating right means to the women who make up the team of dietetic interns at Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services: 


Courtney Darsa
Dietetic Intern at University of Delaware

When someone asks me how I define eating healthy, many different things come to mind.  Consuming a balanced diet that contains plenty of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and low fat dairy products, is only part of my definition.  The most important part of healthy eating is to have a positive relationship with food.  When a person enjoys the food they are eating, it can become a big surprise as to how much more satisfying eating can truly be.  Developing a positive relationship with food is not as easy as it sounds.  When you slow down to eat a meal, it becomes easier to savor and enjoy the flavors of the particular food you are eating.  This gives your body the time to recognize whether or not it is still hungry.  Another definition for this is Mindful Eating.

Mindful eating is defined as eating with awareness.  It is a great way to measure healthy eating because there is no right or wrong answer.   It is about realizing that each individual’s eating experiences are unique and cannot be compared to any other person’s experience.  Mindful eating is about listening to your body’s cravings and satisfying them.  It is about recognizing that there are no “good or bad foods”, eating food in moderation is important.  Yes, there are foods that contain more vitamins and minerals than others (these foods should be eaten more often) but it does not mean that foods that do not contain as many nutrients should be restricted.  Healthy eating is all about balance and listening to your body’s wants and needs.  By developing a healthy relationship with food, you will be come surprised as to how much more enjoyable your eating experiences can be!

banana walnut yogurt parfait MDIO

Laura Iu
Dietetic Intern at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
Instagram: @dowhatiulove

As an alumna of NYU and now a dietetic intern, I’ve realized that studying in the nutrition field by no means makes me perfect in the way I eat; but the way I eat is perfect for me. I’m at my happiest and healthiest when I’m able to cook my own meals, which I prefer to do instead of dining out. I love knowing exactly what ingredients are going into my food which helps me eat healthier, and being in the kitchen is my go-to de-stressor. With every new experience, my definition of “healthy” is evolves. To simplify what “healthy” means to me, I’ll begin by telling you what “healthy” is not. Healthy is not about eating only low-fat foods, low-calories, or feeling guilty after enjoying something tasty. In fact, healthy means not feeling hungry, guilty, or deprived. Being healthy does not mean one must follow a specific diet (i.e. vegetarian, vegan, paleo, etc.) and it also doesn’t mean it must be expensive or the food always organic.

Eating right and being healthy is a balancing act! It requires us to embrace all foods in an amount that makes us feel good, fitting in physical activities for enjoyment, setting aside time for yourself to de-stress, or simply sleep! It’s about nourishing our bodies with wholesome foods—so that we’re not just satisfied, but also energized to live to the fullest today and to another tomorrow—for the people we love, the things we love to do, and most importantly, for ourselves.



Valery Kallen
MS Candidate at New York University

Eating “right” means nourishing both my body and my mind. When I think of food, I don’t just think of calories or nutrients – I think of the whole mind/body connection. So when I try to eat healthy, it’s not just to maintain a certain weight, it’s also because I know that I will feel stronger, more focused, and more at peace with my food choices. And that doesn’t mean depriving myself either; it means eating mostly whatever I want, in moderation. So if I feel like having a scoop of ice cream while watching a Saturday night movie, that’s eating “right” to me. Eating healthy means not feeling guilty about the foods you eat. There are no good foods versus bad foods – it’s not a superhero comic book! When you eat a wholesome, balanced diet the majority of the time, you’ll find that you no longer feel shame over eating the occasional cookie, or two. And there’s something very “right” about that.


Lindsay Marr
BS Nutrition and Dietetics, New York University

In my opinion, eating right doesn’t have to mean deprivation or limitations. In fact, I believe it means the opposite. Eating right is striving to eat all foods in moderation. As both a nutrition graduate and a person with dietary restrictions, eating right is very important to me. Throughout my time as a nutrition student, I worked to maintain a healthy diet filled with wholesome ingredients and balanced meals. To this day, I continue to do so. My version of eating right means reading labels on the foods I buy to ensure the ingredients are safe for me and checking the quality of the products I eat to be sure I am eating the most nutritional items. I eat a diet rich in fresh foods and make sure to enjoy all foods. Eating right is more than aiming for a certain number on a scale or looking a certain way: it is important to maintaining our health. I eat right to fuel my body with the necessary nutrients it needs to thrive. I eat healthfully to feel good now and to continue to feel good later in life. Most importantly, I eat right to enjoy life.


Alyssa Mitola
Dietetic Intern at New York University

Eating right is all about balance, a balance of flavors, tastes, culture, and nutrients. I believe it is essential to nourish your body with adequate nutrients. It is also important to enjoy your food and feel satisfied. When feasible, I love to eat fresh wholesome foods. We are lucky that nature is abundant with so many delicious choices. There is nothing like a fresh tomato in season or a ripe apple picked straight off the tree. But it is important to remember that no food should be off limits when “eating right.” I believe we should eat with intent and take time to enjoy the smells and flavors of the food we eat. Living in NYC, one of my favorite things to do is taste cuisines from all over the world. It amazes me how similar ingredients can be made into so many different dishes. I love discovering new foods and flavors each day. Food and eating not only fulfill essential biological needs, but also social, psychological, and cultural needs. For me, eating right is about understanding all aspects of food and cultivating a healthy relationship with food. Eating right means purposefully choosing foods to fuel one’s mind, body, and soul! Happy National Nutrition Month!


I'm Blogging National Nutrition MonthTo learn more about the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic’s National Nutrition Month, please click here to be redirected to their NNM Page. 

My Exercise Allergy

By Guest Blogger, Rebecca Weiss.

I used to joke and tell people I was allergic to exercise. It did seem that every time we were supposed to run around the track or play dodge ball in middle school I’d start to feel a bit unwell. Those Presidential Physical Fitness contests? I regularly threw up on those days. I think the main reason I hated exercise was that I couldn’t stand the sensation of being out of breath. It panicked me, and make me worry that I’d never catch my breath. It even led to some pretty serious anxiety issues as an adult. So, for the most part, when I ran as a kid, I would stop as soon as I wasn’t breathing normally. And, as a result, I never took to exercise. I did enjoy playing basketball in high school, but never really exerted myself because I hated the feel of my face getting red and my feet hitting the gym floor so heavily. I didn’t want to sweat in front of my classmates. I was too self-conscious to lose myself in the game.

And so, as an adult trying to improve my health and fitness level, I had to start from scratch. Now, people will tell you that all you have to do is walk a bit every day. And, certainly walking can be great exercise. But, I could walk so that I wasn’t burning any calories. My office is about a mile from Penn Station, with no good subway options, and I dreaded the walk every workday. I would adopt a slow pace, talk on my cell phone, take elevators or escalators when available—it wasn’t doing much for me. We all know that for exercise to have an impact you have to get your heart rate up. And, guess what, doing that might change your breathing or cause you to sweat. I did not want that.

One of my greatest role models for exercise was my paternal grandfather who, according to family lore, rode a stationary bike every day until his death at 92. So, at the age of 40, I bought a recumbent exercise bike. No one at the Sports Authority was any help, so I just picked the bike that felt the most comfortable in the store and wasn’t too expensive. Some people came to the house to set it up, and I was on my own. There were pre-set work out programs, a heart-rate checker, calorie counter and more, but I couldn’t figure out how to get my feet in the straps.

The first night I rode the bike for 10 minutes and thought I had made a terrible mistake. I had the tension set at level three (out of 10) and felt like my legs would fall off the entire time. My muscles were burning and I sensed that uncomfortable out-of-breath feeling creeping in. I hated hearing myself huffing and puffing for air. But, I told myself I had to keep trying to see if it got easier. And it did.

After about three weeks, I could ride at that same tension level for 20 minutes without feeling like I was going to die. I actually started to enjoy the feeling of sweat rolling down my face—it felt like I was accomplishing something. I settled into a routine of riding the bike for 30 minutes a night after my kids went to bed, while I watched all the trashy TV shows I could record on the DVR. The Real Housewives. The Soup. Say Yes to the Dress. Yes please! The best was Dancing with the Stars, as I found the music drove me to peddle faster.

After six months I was up to 35 minutes on some of the harder workout programs. I got used to the out-of-breath feeling, sometimes even embraced it. Look what my body can do! I can push myself to the point of discomfort and come out stronger. I don’t feel allergic anymore.

That time on the bike became “Me time.” I started to look forward to it. Even though the workouts were challenging, I craved them. I found that I was also pushing myself more on my walks to and from the office. Using the DWTS model, I listened to fast-paced music to inspire myself to walk faster. With my headphones on, I couldn’t hear myself huffing and puffing as my exertion increased. Using a pedometer helped me keep track of my distance and time, and showed me what a difference taking the stairs can make.

My dietician asked me recently if I think I will stick with this new routine, if it will be part of my life moving forward. I am almost positive that it will be. The truth is, I feel so much better now. I can run to catch my train without feeling that I’m over exerting myself. I have visible muscles in my thighs and calves that look great in skirts. I feel so amazing when I get off that bike each night—I don’t want to give that up.

I hope it means I’ll live to be 92 (or more), but for now it’s enough of a reward to see myself as someone who exercises regularly, and to have overcome fears that have slowed me down—literally—most of my life.

About Rebecca: 

Rebecca Weiss is a writer, mom of two, and director of communications for a New York City auction house. In 2012 she started a fitness and wellness journey. She is a monthly contributor to Mom Dishes It Out.

Spring Pickings

Celebrate Spring with Fresh Fruits and Veggies!

New fruits and vegetables are coming into season. Eating local and seasonal allows you to get the freshest and most nutrient dense produce. Visit your local famer’s market to see what looks bright and crisp. Many farms offer one day opportunities to pick your produce for fun. NJ/NY residents can even pick their own produce at farms like the New WIndsor Farm in NJ. If you don’t want to pick your veggies, you can find out what is in season by searching online.  NY/NJ friends can learn more here. To truly get back to wholesome basics, start your own garden or consider joining a Community Sustainable Agriculture (CSA) Farm. CSA Farms are great for city dwellers with busy schedules and minimal planting space. CSA’s are located throughout Manhattan or deliver your seasonal produce weekly to your door. You can find out more about CSA’s in the Metropolitan area here and here.

What’s in season for Spring in New York?

Early Spring Fennel, Garden Peas, Parsnips, Snow Peas,Turnips

Mid Spring Asparagus, Lettuce, Radishes, Rhubarb, Spinach

Late Spring Apricots, Broccoli, Cabbage, Strawberries, Summer Squash

Here’s a nutritious kid-friendly recipe using one of my favorite Spring fruits: Whole Wheat Strawberry Pancakes

Strawberry Whole Wheat Pancakes via TasteSpotting/Adventures in Cooking
1 1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup canola oil
1 cup low-fat milk
3/4 cup diced strawberries
(Serves 2)
Directions: In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt. Add the oil and milk, whisking until all the dry ingredients are incorporated into the wet. Fold in the strawberries. Heat frying pan over medium-low heat. Pour 1/4 cup of batter into the pan and cook until there are bubbles on the surface and the edges start to firm up, about 2-3 minutes. Flip and cook until the other side is nicely browned, about 1-2 minutes. Serve with a glass of low-fat milk and extra strawberries for a delicious breakfast the whole family can enjoy! 
Recipe adapted from Savvy Eat

National Nutrition Month: Seven Fresh Ideas To Get Your Plate In Shape Each Day

We have all heard about the new “MyPlate” encouraging Americans to eat more veggies. We need to cover half of our plate with little green gods and goddesses of the garden. Lets put our words into action by using these seven tips to get our plate in veggie shape, after all, it is National Nutrition Month. Start by incorporating one tip a day.

  1. Add shredded carrots to your wraps.
  2. Bust out the beets for salad toppers.
  3. Use guacamole rather than cheese on sandwiches.
  4. Grill (or broil) asparagus with a drizzle of olive oil and sea salt.
  5. Shred brussel sprouts and make a roasted brussel sprout slaw.
  6. Add mushrooms to your healthy eggs benedict (see the recipe in the April edition of Fitness Magazine).
  7. Saute swiss chard with olive oil and garlic.

Visit or for more information.

Mom's Universal Snack List For School

Snack Ditty from Eco-Ditty


So it seems many schools have a suggested snack list. Moms keep asking what is appropriate for snack and how do you make a balanced snack choice. In honor of National Nutrition Month (Get Your Plate In Shape), here is my recommended snack list. You can modify if your school follows Kosher or Allergy Free guidelines. Happy Snacking!!

Suggested foods that are ideal for health and growth:

Organic and or local foods especially dairy and fruits; No added sugars are highly encouraged. Please try to buy products with sugar as the third ingredient or more, no preservatives and no artificial colors.


The children often enjoy participating in the shopping for their snack week. Let them help you choose snacks for the week. Try to purchase seedless varieties when possible especially for the 2’s and 3”s. Older children may be open to varied textures and more robust flavors.


Refer to Web MD’s To Buy or Not Buy, Organic:

Chemicals in our food:


Please remember to bring enough snack for ___ children for the entire week.


Snacks: We recommend serving a healthy protein and or healthy fat (real cheese, hummus, edamame), and 1-2 carbohydrates, 1 whole grain (spelt pretzels, multi grain cheerios), and 1 fruit or vegetable equivalent (organic apples, clementines, carrots). There must always be a fruit or a veggie option on a daily basis.


Beverage: Water only.

Protein/Fats: Choose 1/day to serve

Real Cheese:  Mozzarella, Cheddar (the sticks tend to be very popular)

Hard boiled eggs,

Hummus, Guacamole


Greek yogurts (Oikos), Yogurt Squeeze (Stonyfield or Horizon, no Danimals)


Soy Butter, Sunflower Butter (class specific)


Carbohydrates: Whole Grains: Choose 0 -1/day to serve

Ak-Mak crackers, Wholegrain crackers (Kashi), Kalvi Rye Crackers

Baked Tortilia Chips, Kale Chips

Multigrain Goldfish

Multigrain cheerios or cereal

Whole Grain Rice Cakes

Whole Wheat Matzos

Natural Air Popped Popcorn (Bearitos and Naked Popcorn)

Spelt, whole wheat or whole grain pretzels (Snyder’s, Annies Organic)


Carbohydrates: Fruits and Vegetables: Choose 1/day to serve

Organic Apples

Unswtned organic applesauce


Organic Blueberries



Cucumbers – peeled and sliced, seedless

Dried fruit with no added sugars and or oils

Organic Grapes

Melons – seedless

Organic Pepper Slices

Organic Strawberries



Organic raisins

Or any fruit/veggie your child loves!