The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

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The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

EALM Product Review: Garden Lites Muffins

EALM Product Review:

Garden Lites Carrot Berry Muffins

These muffins are so tasty, even my picky eater approves of them!

Photo Courtesy of Garden Lites
Photo Courtesy of Garden Lites

With the most delicious taste accented by blueberries, everyone will love these adorable little muffins. The first ingredient is carrots so that is an obvious thumbs up. The second is egg whites so another thumbs up. And the third, a gluten free flour blend that contains brown rice, and flaxseed meal. Screen shot 2014-12-15 at 2.00.46 PMThis is a great snack option for kids. Especially those who need to consume more veggies. Plus, they’re allergy-friendly and make a great snack for parents!

Is “Gluten Free” for Your Family?: Autism and Gluten, Casein Free

*This post was originally published on the Bitsy’s Brainfood Blog. To see the original please click here.

Photo Credit: Whatsername? via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Whatsername? via Compfight cc

Is “Gluten Free” for Your Family: Autism and Gluten, Casein Free
By Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE, CEDRD, and Mom

There aren’t too many quality research studies reporting on the gluten-free diet and its efficacy for children with autism spectrum disorders. However, you definitely hear the media and parents supporting it. The latest solid research a.k.a. randomized double-blind study only had fifteen children with ASD. This particular study from 2006 looked at the effects of the gluten-free, casein-free diet on autistic symptoms and urinary peptide levels. Surprisingly, there were no statistically significant results, still leaving the need for more research and many parents without answers. When reading the overall research, it seems parents may notice behavioral changes but nothing consistent across the board and nothing significant enough to make the recommendation to follow this diet.

However, when you keep reading, the association between ASD and GI (gastrointestinal) complaints is quite clear. Adverse GI symptoms such as diarrhea and abdominal pain are reported from 9 to 91 percent in different study populations1. The cause of these GI problems is unclear, but it appears to relate partially to abnormal carbohydrate digestion1 and abnormal gut flora possibly due to excessive use of oral antibiotics2. If gut flora is a concern, probiotics may help decrease ASD symptoms.

As parents wait for more information, many are willing to try the variety of diets that promise decreased symptoms. Like any child, a child with ASD is an individual and may/may not respond to dietary changes. It could be like many other foods—there are intolerances or sensitivities not recognizable as food allergies. There are many questions for parents to ask themselves and/or their child’s team. Weigh the pros and cons and decide what you think is best for your child.

– See more at the Bitsy’s Brainfood Blog.

 

References:

1. Williams, B. L., M. Hornig, T. Buie, M. L. Bauman, M. Cho Paik, et al. “Impaired Carbohydrate Digestion and Transport and Mucosal Dysbiosis in the Intestines of Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Disturbances.” PLoS ONE 6, no. 9 (2011): e24585. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0024585.

2. Adams, et al. “Gastrointestinal Flora and Gastrointestinal Status in Children with Autism–Comparisons to Typical Children and Correlation with Autism Severity.” BMC Gastroenterology 11, no. 22 (2011). doi:10.1186/1471-230X-11-22

Restaurant Review: ReViVer, Wild, Back Forty

Restaurant Review Blog
ReViVer, Wild, Back Forty
By Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

 

Sometimes it can be hard to find a balanced choice for dinner or lunch that is delicious and consciously prepared. Luckily, the team at Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services has found 3 wonderful restaurants that fit the bill. Read on to learn where to go and what to get on your next meal out.

 

ReViVer
(934 8th avenue between 55th and 56th street)
www.revivernyc.com

 

ReViVer is a great pick-up and go place located near Columbus Circle. If you’re in need of fast food that’s actually nutritious, then look no further. The restaurant’s mission is to have “the perfect union of culinary art and nutrition science.” The menu was developed with the help of a Registered Dietitian to provide balanced dishes that meet certain nutritional pre-requisites – and it actually tastes good! When I ate there, I noticed there were many options for the carnivore or vegetarian.

At Reviver, there are four core Food Principles: Balance, Nutritious, Clean, and Pure. Each dish is balanced to have proportions of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Each dish is nutritious in that it promotes vegetables, fruits, fiber and omega-3 fatty acids. They also have a futuristic technology they use to cook their antibiotic-free and hormone-free proteins, which is used to prepare the mahi-mahi tacos.

ReviverTaco

Think of ReViVer as your go-to for a quick lunch or dinner. It’s something you would make at home, but just don’t have the time to do. The restaurant is also now on seamless, making your dinner plans that much easier.

Eating at ReViVer is every New Yorker’s dream for healthy take-out. Your palate will be satisfied and your heart will be happy and healthy.

 

Wild
(535 Hudson Street between Charles St. and Perry St.)
www.eatdrinkwild.com 

Wild

It’s time to go wild over some delicious pasta, pizza and veggies. Wild in the West Village offers many conscious options for diners. It’s a great place to eat-in or pick-up for lunch and dinner. Wild’s mission is to “give people a positive environment to eat nourishing, yummy food, and offer true piece of mind.” There are three locations: West Village, Williamsburg and now, Las Vegas.

SkinnyB*tchPizza

The Skinny B*tch Pizza is more than just a brazen name. Served on a gluten-free vegan crust, it’s made to taste more like a cheese-less flatbread than a pizza, most definitely worth ordering. The eggplant and squash have a great deal of flavor, which paired well with the house-made tomato sauce. We also sampled the Wild Mushroom Herb Pasta served with wild arugula. That was delicious. The only setback here was we were hoping to try the Spaghetti Limone Parmigiano (basically a lemon pasta) that was featured on the online menu, but it was not available when we got to the restaurant.

If you’re looking for a simple and solid salad, the Wild Arugula is a safe bet. More adventurous eaters may opt for the Quinoa salad (with curry) or the Kale Salad (with smoked tofu).

Finally, we discuss the sweets. Wild caught our eye when we saw they had a Kale Cupcake. Now, we’ve seen kale in just about everything. But, a cupcake? This we had to try. Alas, that wasn’t available either. We opted for the vegan and gluten-free coconut brownie that was very fudgy and rich.

Even though there were a few menu inconsistencies, Wild is worth a visit. Your body and mind will thank you.

 

Back Forty
(190 Avenue B #1 between 11th and 12th street)
www.backfortynyc.com 

BackFortyCod

If you’re looking for a cozy farm-to-table experience, Back Forty has got you covered. The food is very fresh, and they source their veggies from local farms upstate.

You can’t go wrong with the halibut. Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Service clients say this is one of their favorite dishes there. As we expected, the menu changes with the seasons. If you can, try and sit in the garden while the weather is still pleasant. According to the website, Back Forty is a burger joint deep down, but a consciously sourced one at that. There are also plenty of options for vegetarians to enjoy.

They also have a Westside location on Prince Street, for those unable to venture into alphabet city. This summer Back Forty is offering Crab Boils in the East Village location if you’re looking for a chef-driven way to celebrate the season.

What is Gluten? Setting the Record Straight for Celiac Awareness Month

What is Gluten? Setting the Record Straight for Celiac Awareness Month
By Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

 

WE LOVE THE Jimmy Kimmel video titled ‘What is Gluten?’! In case you missed it, we’ll give you a quick recap. A reporter over at Jimmy Kimmel asked a number of people if they were on a gluten free diet. They all answered yes, yet could not define gluten. That’s right, people are avoiding gluten but they have no idea what it really is or is not. While the video clip hits on the lack of food and nutrition knowledge of many Americans, EALM feels it is necessary to educate the public! So here you go!

 

 

Gluten is made up of two proteins known as gliadin and glutenin. Gluten is the “glue” that holds most baked goods together and is found in wheat, rye, barley, and contaminated oats. While it may seem easy to some to cut gluten out of your diet, gluten has a way of sneaking into foods unnoticed.

Photo Credit: me'nthedogs via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: me’nthedogs via Compfight cc

Here’s a list of ingredients that contain gluten [i][ii]:

  • Barley
  • Bulgur
  • Durum
  • Farro/Faro
  • Graham flour
  • Hydrolyzed wheat protein
  • Kamut (a type of wheat)
  • Malt, malt extract, malt syrup, and malt flavoring
  • Malt vinegar
  • Malted milk
  • Modified wheat starch
  • Oatmeal, oat bran, oat flour, and whole oats (unless they are from pure, uncontaminated oats and properly labeled as gluten-free)
  • Rye bread and flour
  • Seitan (A meat-like food derived from wheat gluten used in many vegetarian dishes)
  • Semolina
  • Spelt
  • Triticale
  • Wheat bran, flour, germ, or starch
Photo Credit: Leo Reynolds via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Leo Reynolds via Compfight cc

Gluten can also be lurking in the following food items, so be sure to read the label when shopping to ensure that you’re getting a gluten-free product1, 2.

  • Breading and bread stuffing
  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Bouillon cubes
  • Broth or stocks (including beef, chicken, or vegetable)
  • Candy
  • Cooking sprays (especially baking varieties)
  • Cold cuts, hot dogs, salami, sausage
  • Communion wafers
  • Dried fruits (some can be covered in flour to prevent sticking)
  • French fries
  • Gravy
  • Imitation fish (surimi)
  • Licorice
  • Ketchups (be sure to read the label)
  • Matzo, matzo meal
  • Rice mixes (pre-boxed)
  • Sauces
  • Seasoned meat and poultry
  • Seasoned tempeh and tofu
  • Seasoned potato or tortilla chips
  • Soy milks (some varieties)
  • Soy sauce
  • Tamari sauce
  • Teriyaki sauce

 

 

For more information on all things gluten including Celiac Disease, gluten free grocery shopping, label regulations and gluten free nutrition, check out the following list of blogs:

 

All About Gluten: Your Questions Answered

New FDA Ruling Making Waves in Gluten Free Community

Eating Healthfully When Gluten Free

Navigating the Gluten Free Aisle: A Guide to GF Shopping

 

 

 


[i] Case, Shelley. Gluten-free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide. Regina: Case Nutrition Consulting, 2002. Print.

[ii] Thompson, Tricia. The Gluten-Free Nutrition Guide. McGraw-Hill, 2008. Print.

 

Navigating the Gluten-Free Aisle: A Guide to GF Shopping

Navigating the Gluten-Free Aisle: A Guide to Gluten-Free Shopping
By Lindsay Marr and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Photo Credit: Whatsername? via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Whatsername? via Compfight cc

The gluten-free world can be daunting, especially for a newly diagnosed celiac or gluten-intolerant. Navigating the aisles of the grocery store can seem even scarier. Thankfully, there are more gluten-free options in stores and the labeling laws are becoming stricter, making gluten-free shopping less of a matter of chance. We took to the grocery stores to try and help ease the confusion and offer you a list of some healthful gluten-free tips.

 

You may remember we wrote about the new gluten-free labels this past summer and touched on the different aspects of the gluten-free diet in the fall. To touch base, the FDA has decided to consider foods with no more than 20ppm (parts per million) of gluten as gluten-free. But, what does 20ppm mean, you ask?  20ppm is the least amount of gluten that can be found in foods via reliable scientific analysis testing. It is also the level that meets many other countries’ standards for safety.

 

Can you trust a gluten-free label?

With the new FDA rulings, you can expect food companies to be more cautious in their labeling. In fact, we may even see a few gluten-free products come off the shelves, as some manufacturers may not want to go through the trouble of abiding by the FDA’s gluten-free rulings. If you feel uneasy before the August 2014 deadline, you can look for two seals on packages to assure the products you’re buying are gluten-free.

Screen shot 2014-04-06 at 10.34.22 AM
This image was used with the permission of The Gluten Intolerance Group.

Gluten-Free Certification Organization (GFCO): The GFCO is currently the leading gluten-free certification program in the world. It is an independent organization that verifies the “quality, integrity, and purity of products” and certifies gluten-free products to no more than 10 PPM.
Click here for the label.
CSA (Celiac Sprue Association): The CSA seal is given to products that have undergone a review and testing of ingredients to ensure the product is free of wheat, rye, barley and oats.

 

Which gluten-free products should I choose? 

Gluten free food companies are making efforts to make their food products more healthy by adding fiber, using brown rice flour instead of white rice flour and some are even using gluten free grains like buckwheat for this first ingredient. EALM was quite impressed to see these changes. However, some food labels noted the addition of added fibers like inulin, which is a non-digestible form of fiber that can cause gas.

 

Photo Credit: Caden Crawford via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Caden Crawford via Compfight cc

Let’s Go Shopping!

When searching for the gluten-free foods with the most nutrition, we recommend using the following tips:

 

  1. Always double check!
    • Be sure to read the ingredients list for potential gluten, even if the product boasts a GF label or seal of approval from the organizations mentioned above. Food products and manufacturing practices change often and some companies even use the GF seals fraudulently. So, be aware and read those ingredients!
  2. Read the ingredients to educate yourself on which product is more nutrient dense!
    • When searching for healthier GF packaged goods look for nutrient-dense flours like quinoa, garbanzo bean, and brown rice. Also watch where these items are listed within the ingredient lists – ideally they are listed in ingredients one through five.
  3. Look for natural fiber!
    • As mentioned before, many high-fiber GF foods contain added carbohydrates like inulin or psyllium husk. While these carbs add fiber without affecting the texture or taste of the food, they can result in gas production (not so comfy for sensitive stomachs). Look for products that are naturally gluten-free, like corn meal or certified gluten-free oats. When in doubt, you can increase your fruit and vegetable intake for a boost of fiber, too.
  4. When in doubt…
    • Tap into some resources! There are a number of apps, subscription services, and organizations that keep consumers updated on all news relating to gluten-free. Take a look at our list below that will help you be a GF detective.

 

GF DETECTIVE Resources:

Celiac Disease Foundation

  • The CDF offers numerous resources for those affected by Celiac Disease, including a list of GF medications and supplements, tips for managing the holidays, as well as the latest research and gluten-free news.

 

Celiac Sprue Association

  • The CSA’s website offers a host of resources for those with Celiac and gluten intolerance. With lists of restaurants, recipes, and information on GF labeling, you are sure to find great information on all things gluten-free.

 

Gluten Free Watchdog

  • This handy monthly subscription is run by registered dietitian, Tricia Thompson, and for only $4.99 per month, you can have access to the latest in gluten free news and product testing results.

 

Gluten Intolerance Group

  • The GIG offers an annual membership with perks including access to food and medical information, educational programs, events, and even summer camps for children with gluten-sensitivities.

 

National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (Celiac Central)

  • The NFCA offers a list of GF manufacturers, keeps readers updated on GF news, and provides free webinars for readers. This is a great site when looking for GF news and information.

National Celiac Awareness Day

This past Friday was National Celiac Awareness Day. And we’re excited to say the topic trended on Twitter, which is a big deal for the Celiac community! Celiac Disease affects every 1 in 133 people or, roughly, 1% of the population, but an estimated 83% of those with Celiac Disease are not aware they have the disease1. So, the trend not only drew attention to the disease, but it also allowed members of the community to connect with each other over social media. We were so happy to see the trend that we wanted to share a few of our gluten-free recipes with our readers:

Quinoa with Sauteed Mushrooms and Kale

Omelet with Summer Veggies

Spinach and Leek Frittata

Crispy Kale Chips

Gluten-Free Lemon Meringue Pie

 

Celiac_1in133

We also wanted to share some resources for those who were curious to learn more about Celiac Disease:

National Foundation for Celiac Awareness, NFCA

Free Webinar: This Wednesday, 9/18 at 8:00PM EDT the NFCA will be offering a free webinar for those interested in learning more about the FDA’s ruling on gluten-free labeling.

All About Gluten: Your Questions Answered

 

Let us know if you like the recipes and we’d love to hear some of your gluten-free favorites!