The Vogue Milk: Which milk is for you?

The Vogue Milk

Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE

Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services, NYC

Almond, Cashew, Cow, Goat, Hemp, Oat, Rice…

Almond Milk

Gone are the days of whole, low fat, no fat milk. Now one can choose milk from other animals such as a goat or from other plants like hemp! Whether you have food allergies or practice a vegan lifestyle, milk options are as plentiful nowadays as fast-food. But which option is best suited for you? Moms, these milks are not equivalent to breast milk and or formula and should therefore never be substituted for a child less than one year old.

Milk’s Muscle: Most Important To Consider –  First and foremost consider the percent of calcium, Vit D, and Vit. B12; next consider how many grams of protein, calories, and for some people even the level of carbohydrate.

For Vegan or Even Vegetarian Diets: Almond, Cashew, Oat, Hemp or Rice – look for a milk high in calcium with at least 30-50% calcium. The milk should have B12 since B12 is otherwise deficient in a vegan diet.

For Food Allergies (spec. food allergies like dairy and soy): the right choice is rice milk but make sure it is enriched in calcium, and Vit D. Be sure to get protein through food, since rice milk is not a significant source of protein.

For Food Intolerances: If you have lactose intolerance you may want to try soy, oat or cashew milk. Goats’ milk does have lactose however each individual must experiment with each type of milk to see what is most easily digested.

For Diabetes: Consider unsweetened soy milk for only 4 grams of carb/serving (Silk Brand specifically).  Be wary of flavored milks and milks lower in protein (< 6-8 grams pro/serving).

For One Stop Shopping: Consider skim milk or 1% for great taste, a good source of  calcium, Vit. D and protein. It is equal to one carbohydrate exchange being that one serving of milk equals 12 grams of carbohydrate.

For Children ages 1-2: Whole milk is recommended between ages 1 and 2 unless a child has a food allergy or has been advised otherwise by their medical doctor.

What’s In Your Coconut Yogurt?

 

So Delicious Dairy Free Plain Coconut Milk Yogurt

So Delicious Plain Coconut Milk Yogurt is one of the many yogurt options for people with lactose intolerance or an allergy to dairy. I love yogurt! Yogurt, especially greek yogurt and soy yogurt are two of my favorite foods to eat as part of my breakfast, lunch or snack. When choosing an alternative to dairy yogurt, you may find a long list of ingredients. Below find a breakdown of the coconut milk yogurt ingredients and what each means for your health.

Ingredients: ORGANIC COCONUT MILK (ORGANIC COCONUT CREAM, WATER, GUAR GUM, XANTHAN GUM), ORGANIC EVAPORATED CANE JUICE, PECTIN, CHICORY ROOT EXTRACT (INULIN), TAPIOCA DEXTROSE, ALGIN (KELP EXTRACT), MAGNESIUM PHOSPHATE, TRICALCIUM PHOSPHATE, ORGANIC RICE STARCH, LOCUST BEAN GUM, LIVE CULTURES, CARRAGEENAN, DIPOTASSIUM PHOSPHATE, VITAMIN B12.

  • ORGANIC COCONUT CREAM: A product very similar to coconut milk but contains less water. It is a smooth, thick liquid made from fresh coconuts. It is thick and very sweet and has a paste-like consistency.
  • WATER: H2O
  • GUAR GUM: A gum found in the endosperm of the guar plant. It is used in desserts, baked products, ice cream and other products due to its ability to stabilize and gel.
  • XANTHAN GUM: A microbial exudates gum produced by Xanthomonas campestris. It is used as a thickening and stabilizing agent.
  • ORGANIC EVAPORATED CANE JUICE: Like regular sugar, it is a sweetener made from sugar cane,  but the juice does not undergo the same degree of processing that refined sugar does. Therefore, unlike refined sugar, it retains more of the nutrients found in sugar cane.
  • PECTIN: It is produced commercially as a white to light brown powder, mainly extracted from citrus fruits, and is used in food as a gelling agent particularly in jams and jellies. It is also used in fillings, medicines, sweets, as a stabilizer in fruit juices and milk drinks, and as a source of dietary fiber.
  • CHICORY ROOT EXTRACT (INULIN): A complex carbohydrate that is a polymer of fructose. It is not digested so it contributes fiber and can be combined with carrageenan to create a creamy texture.
  • TAPIOCA DEXTROSE: A simple sugar derived from the tapioca plant.
  • ALGIN (KELP EXTRACT): A product used to form gels and films. It is a gum with mannose and guluronic acid as its principal components and with numerous salts resulting from the presence of sodium, potassium, and ammonium ions.
  • MAGNESIUM PHOSPHATE: A food additive that provides a source of magnesium.
  • TRICALCIUM PHOSPHATE: A food additive that provides a source of calcium.
  • ORGANIC RICE STARCH: A commercially refined starch derived from rice. It is used as a thickener and stabilizer.
  • LOCUST BEAN GUM: From the seed of evergreen trees, it gels with xanthan gum  and helps stabilize products such as ice cream, bologna, and sauces. It can replace up to half the starched used for thickening. It also enhances fiber content.
  • LIVE CULTURES: Living organisms, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, which convert pasteurized milk to yogurt during fermentation. These may act as probiotics and help improve gastrointestinal health.
  • CARRAGEENAN: A seaweed extract that has the ability to interact with protein to aid in the stabilization of products. It is easily cross-linked with other gums.
  • DIPOTASSIUM PHOSPHATE: A food additive used for protein stabilization.
  • VITAMIN B12: Added vitamin.

Mom's Universal Snack List For School

Snack Ditty from Eco-Ditty

 

So it seems many schools have a suggested snack list. Moms keep asking what is appropriate for snack and how do you make a balanced snack choice. In honor of National Nutrition Month (Get Your Plate In Shape), here is my recommended snack list. You can modify if your school follows Kosher or Allergy Free guidelines. Happy Snacking!!

Suggested foods that are ideal for health and growth:

Organic and or local foods especially dairy and fruits; No added sugars are highly encouraged. Please try to buy products with sugar as the third ingredient or more, no preservatives and no artificial colors.

 

The children often enjoy participating in the shopping for their snack week. Let them help you choose snacks for the week. Try to purchase seedless varieties when possible especially for the 2’s and 3”s. Older children may be open to varied textures and more robust flavors.

 

Refer to Web MD’s To Buy or Not Buy, Organic: http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/ss/slideshow-to-buy-or-not-to-buy-organic

Chemicals in our food: http://www.cspinet.org/reports/chemcuisine.htm

 

Please remember to bring enough snack for ___ children for the entire week.

 

Snacks: We recommend serving a healthy protein and or healthy fat (real cheese, hummus, edamame), and 1-2 carbohydrates, 1 whole grain (spelt pretzels, multi grain cheerios), and 1 fruit or vegetable equivalent (organic apples, clementines, carrots). There must always be a fruit or a veggie option on a daily basis.

 

Beverage: Water only.

Protein/Fats: Choose 1/day to serve

Real Cheese:  Mozzarella, Cheddar (the sticks tend to be very popular)

Hard boiled eggs,

Hummus, Guacamole

Edamame

Greek yogurts (Oikos), Yogurt Squeeze (Stonyfield or Horizon, no Danimals)

Olives

Soy Butter, Sunflower Butter (class specific)

 

Carbohydrates: Whole Grains: Choose 0 -1/day to serve

Ak-Mak crackers, Wholegrain crackers (Kashi), Kalvi Rye Crackers

Baked Tortilia Chips, Kale Chips

Multigrain Goldfish

Multigrain cheerios or cereal

Whole Grain Rice Cakes

Whole Wheat Matzos

Natural Air Popped Popcorn (Bearitos and Naked Popcorn)

Spelt, whole wheat or whole grain pretzels (Snyder’s, Annies Organic)

 

Carbohydrates: Fruits and Vegetables: Choose 1/day to serve

Organic Apples

Unswtned organic applesauce

Bananas

Organic Blueberries

Carrots

Clementines

Cucumbers – peeled and sliced, seedless

Dried fruit with no added sugars and or oils

Organic Grapes

Melons – seedless

Organic Pepper Slices

Organic Strawberries

Salsa

String-beans

Organic raisins

Or any fruit/veggie your child loves!

Women's Health Magazine

Congratulations to Beth for winning an Initial Nutrition Consult with Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE.

Thanks to everyone who participated in nutrition counseling at the September Women’s Health Magazine  Are You Game event!!

To have a chance at winning a free consult, “like” Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services

on Facebook. Help us get 200 Likes by Thanksgiving.

Mom Dishes It Out

So with heightened nerves, I have entered two new worlds. One being the MAC Book Pro and the other, the world of Twitter. You can follow me at @MomDishesItOut. I will be tweeting about Mom things concerning raising our kids and food. My new mommy blog is useable www.MomDishesItout.com but not too pretty yet. Give me a few days and the new blog will be as yummy as a Magnolia’s cupcake. Cheers!!

The Other Butter:

My oldest son’s school is “NUT SAFE” meaning nut free. For many parents, this leaves us in bewilderment when trying to make our kids a nut free snack or lunch. This is especially challenging when we have picky palates to deal with.

The Solution:

If you can no longer send peanut butter to school, spread some soy nut butter on your kid’s sandwich. Shh, don’t tell them and see if they notice the difference. My picky eater noticed something was different, but liked it. Even better was when I sent the soy nut butter to school for snack week, the teachers reported the class loved eating it as their protein choice during snack time. The teachers commented that they were sharing the idea with the class parents.

Soy foods are listed as one of the top eight food allergens but are neither a peanut or tree nut. Therefore, they are typically safe and appropriate in a nut free environment. To learn more about food allergies specifically peanuts and tree nuts visit:  http://www.foodallergy.org/page/tree-nut-allergy. For more information on feeding your kids, stay tuned for my new mommy blog:  www.MomDishesItOut.com!!!

 

100% Juice is okay

In a study reported in the Archives of Pediatrics, children age 2-11 who consumed 100% juice about 4 oz daily also had a higher intake of whole fruits. There was no difference in weight status or the likelihood of being overweight among the 100% juice drinkers. Theresa A. Nicklas; Carol E. O’Neil; Ronald Kleinman
Association Between 100% Juice Consumption and Nutrient Intake and Weight of Children Aged 2 to 11 Years
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008;162(6):557-565.

TAKE HOME MESSAGE FOR PARENTS AND CAREGIVERS:

100% juice is okay in moderation. Be sure the juice you give is 100%.

Find Your G Bar.

Finding your granola bar is no easy task. While traveling I have shopped at Von’s in Coronado, CA and King Kullen in Brigdehampton, New York. It is quite overwhelming by how many choices you, the consumer has. So here are some guidelines to find a bar to eat as a snack. Just so you know, I walked out of Von’s with no granola bars.

Quick Granola Bar Guidelines:

Calories< 150
Saturated Fat 3 grams
Protein > 4 grams

TOP CHOICE:
http://kashi.com/products/chewy_granola_bars_honey_almond_flax
http://store.gnufoods.com/store/

RUNNER UP:
http://www.clifbar.com/food/products_clif_kid_zbar/
http://www.cascadianfarm.com/products/product_detail.aspx?cat=21&upc=0-21908-28281-7

TTM Stages of Change – What stage are you at?

TTM is the transtheoretical model of change. TTM identifies 5 stages of change:

Precontemplation, Contemplation, Preparation, Action and Maintenance.

Have you ever wondered why you know all of the latest nutrition trends, read food labels and know how many points each food is, yet you can’t seem attain your health goals? The stages of change can help to explain what stage you are in and help you understand the process of change you must endure before moving to the next stage. If you fit the example above, you are most likely stuck in the preparation stage. Now you need to identify how to proceed to the action phase.