Surviving the Holidays with Diabetes

Surviving the Holidays with Diabetes is a Family Affair

Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE – Dietitian, Diabetes Educator, and Mom

www.EatingandLivingModerately.com & www.MomDishesItOut.com

 

 

Make peace with carbs: Just because you or your loved one has Diabetes, it doesn’t mean carbohydrates are the enemy.

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  1. Plan ahead by counting carbohydrates and spreading them out throughout the day.
  2. Make carbohydrates like pasta and rice, a side dish rather than the entrée.

Designate Dessert: If you love sweets, include them in your intake.

  1. Rather than feel deprived and end up binging, plan your piece of cake. Eat protein and veggies for your entrée and use your carbs for dessert.
  2. The family chef can make mini desserts or just make less dessert, avoiding temptation.

Walk Your Sugar Down: Moving after a meal is helpful to reduce blood glucose.

  1. After the holiday meal, get your entire family up and out to see holiday decorations or have a snowball fight.
  2. Walking and or light exercise helps to lower your blood glucose and consequently your insulin.

It’s a Family Affair: If you or your loved one has Diabetes, have the entire family engaged and have everyone eat as if they had Diabetes.

  1. It’s sabotage to offer the rest of the guests food that someone else can’t have. If the family eats the same foods, pasta as the side rather than the entrée, no one will feel left out and no one will be tempted to overload on carbohydrates.
  2. Family member are genetically at risk for Diabetes. If the whole family eats in a balanced manner, you will be helping to prevent their chances of Diabetes later in life.

Mix Your Meals: Eat carbohydrates, proteins and fat together.

  1. Protein and fat take longer to digest. If you eat your carbohydrates with these foods, the carbs will be digested slowly and your blood sugar less likely to spike.
  2. Mixing meals and snacks help to regulate blood sugar and hormones and consequently help to keep you feeling satiated longer.
    1. Shrimp Cocktail with cocktail sauce
    2. Greek yogurt with fresh fruit
    3. Hummus with veggies and warm whole wheat pita
    4. Mini turkey meatballs with marinara
    5. Veggie and low fat cheese napoleons

Staying Healthy During the Holidays

This is a big week for holiday parties and holiday planning. Read my 7 tips to get your through the next weeks leading up to the New Year!!

Staying Healthy During the Holidays
By: Laura Cipullo RD CDE

  1. Be the Tupperware Lady– bring Tupperware to family events to pack leftovers or “seconds” and  bring home to eat another time.
    • Rather than overeat on delicious food, plan to use hunger fullness cues. Pack the remainders up for a mini holiday dinner part II.
  2. Healthy Cook Book Exchange(rather than cookie exchange)
    • Holidays typically revolve around gifts and food, so why not give a gift about being healthy and moderate? Healthy cookbook ideas are the Mayo Clinic Williams – Sonoma Cookbook and Martha Stewart’s Healthy Quick Cook
  3. Favor family over food– make festivities about seeing family and not about eating food.
    • Serve a simple meal and focus on entertainment like music and or trivial pursuit.
  4. Stretch your dollar, save your waist – Use Intuitive Eating to portion your restaurant meal.
    • Be economical and bring leftovers home to eat at the next day’s snack or meal.
  5. Eat your favorite food– skip the appetizers and save room for dinner.
    • If dessert is your favorite, don’t fill up on apps and entrees. Make sure you are still hungry for your chocolate cake!!
  6. Secure a snack– before leaving make sure you are not starving, eat a snack to prevent overeating at the party.
    • Restriction cause binging, don’t restrict the day of a special event. You are likely to overeat or even binge later that night.
  7. Wine, beer and liquor on a full belly. If you drink on an empty stomach you are more likely to make poor decisions and overeat.
    • Take your sip of wine with your entrée. If you drink on an empty stomach you will not be mindful of your internal or external cues.
    • Most importantly, don’t drink and drive.

Laura contributes to eHow.com – Olive oil is 26% cheaper

A cornucopia of ideas for a thriftier Thanksgiving and ways to give back are shared in www.eHow.com’sBountiful Thanksgiving Budget article. See your RD’s suggestions like “meals on wheels”, volunteering the week after the holiday for your soup kitchen and saving you heart & wallet with olive oil at eHow.

Exercise Tips from APMA

4 Important Exercise Tips from the American Podiatric Medical Association.

Target Heart Rate: “As you work out, monitor your heart rate to stay near the target heart range (start with 220, subtract your age, then multiply by 0.8 to find target heart range). You should be within five of the target range. Monitor pulse at peak and after final cool-off and compare. The difference is known as your cardiac reserve.”

Hydration: “Drink adequate water to avoid dehydration during workouts which can cause nausea, dizziness, muscle fatigue, and cramping.”

Cool Down: “Don’t under estimate the importance of the cool-off period. It burns off lactic acid (which makes muscles feel tired) and adrenalin, while keeping blood from pooling in the extremities.”

Pace Yourself: “While fitness professionals exercise vigorously six times a week, it’s best to start slower. Although it varies by the individual, it’s safe to start exercising twice a week for several weeks, then gradually increase to a maximum of five times a week. Remember to pace yourself, and listen to your body. If you feel pain, stop. Don’t attempt to exercise through pain, or you may aggravate an acute injury into a chronic or even permanent one. If you continue to be bothered by pain more than 24 hours after exercising, see a physician.”

The above is taken directly from http://www.aapsm.org/aerobics.html.

Tips to Avoid Mindless Eating

In 2009, I attended a seminar Turning Mindless Eating tm Into Mindless Weight Loss taught by Brian Wansink, PhD Food Psychologist at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. Here are the tips I learned:

Tips to Avoid Mindless Eating

  1. Repackage snacks into individual sized bags to prevent overconsumption. Larger containers make us more likely to over-indulge.
  2. Store foods in cupboards or the pantry rather than on the counter or other open area. You’ll be less likely to mindless munch on foods if you have to go out of your way to get them.
  3. Eat on smaller dinner plates. Using larger plates leads us to overfill our plate unintentionally and consequently eat more.
  4. Be cautious of food labels claiming “low-fat,” “low-sugar,” or “low-calorie.” These foods can cause people to overeat because they don’t feel as “guilty” about consuming them in comparison to the regular versions.
  5. If you are feeling sad, don’t use food to try to improve your mood.  Instead, try going for a walk, watching a movie, or talking to a friend.
If you like these tips, show your appreciation by subscribing to
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Give thanks for a healthier Thanksgiving:

Are you counting down yet? In less than 22 days you will either be making or eating some yummy stuffing. Start planning now. Here are 3 recipes to make your Thanksgiving heart healthy. There is a recipe to meet everyone’s food preference –    the meat lover, the vegetarian and  of course the vegan. Use low fat, low salt broth in the following recipes to make them even healthier.

 

Low Fat Bread and Sausage Stuffing

Ingredients:

4 ounces chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed

1 teaspoon canola oil

1 cup chopped onion

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup chopped mushrooms

1 tablespoon fresh sage, finely chopped

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1 pound day-old artisan bread cubes

1 14 1/2–ounce can fat free, low sodium chicken broth

1 egg, lightly beaten, or 2 egg whites

 

Directions: Spray a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray. Cook sausage meat until browned, breaking it into chunks with a spatula. Remove from pan and set aside. Add 1 teaspoon canola oil to skillet. Add onion, celery and mushrooms, and sauté until tender. In a large bowl, combine bread cubes with cooked sausage, vegetable mixture, herbs and pepper. Whisk together broth and egg, and pour over stuffing mixture. Toss well to coat. Spoon stuffing into 13-inch x 9-inch baking dish and bake at 350 degrees for 40-45 minutes, or until browned.

Serves 12

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 134 Calories; 2.7g Fat; 0.6g Sat Fat; 21.8g Carbohydrates; 6.5g Protein; 1.6g Fiber; 23mg Cholesterol; 341mg Sodium

http://lowfatcooking.about.com/od/holidayrecipes/r/breadstuff1104.htm

 

 

Vegetarian Thanksgiving Stuffing

Ingredients:

8 slices whole wheat bread

1 1/2 cups vegetable broth

1 1/2 cup chopped onion

1 1/2 cup chopped celery

¼ cup granny smith apples (finely chopped with skin on)

1/3 cup fat-free liquid egg substitute

1 tablespoon fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon fresh thyme

1 tablespoon fresh sage

2 tablespoons light butter

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Directions: Start by drying out your bread. You can either do this by toasting in the oven, or by leaving the bread sit out at room temperature overnight. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a medium pot, combine chicken broth, onions, celery, apples, butter, salt, pepper, rosemary, thyme and sage. Cook for about 15 minutes over medium heat. Meanwhile, break up your bread into small ½” pieces by chopping or just breaking apart with your hands. Put bread into a large oven safe dish. When broth mixture is ready, slowly pour onto bread, making sure to cover all the pieces. Next, mix in the egg substitute and make sure to cover all pieces. If bread cubes do not seem wet enough (they should be moist, but not saturated), add a tablespoon or two of warm water until appropriate texture is reached. Season with more salt and pepper if desired. Cover dish with foil and transfer to over. Cook for about 25 minutes. Then, take out stuffing, mix it around and fluff it a bit and put back in the oven, uncovered for about another 15 minutes.

Serves 4
Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 229 Calories; 5.1g Fat; 2.4g Sat Fat; 32.5g Carbohydrates; 13.8g Protein; 5.7g Fiber; 8mg Cholesterol; 637mg Sodium

http://www.laaloosh.com/2009/11/20/low-calorie-thanksgiving-stuffing-recipe/#ixzz1csvpvywI

 

 

 

Brown-Rice and Cranberry Stuffing

Ingredients:

2 tablespoon olive oil

3 medium carrots cut into 1/2-inch dice

2 medium fennel bulbs, cored and cut into 1/4-inch dice

2 stalk celery, cut into 1/4-inch dice

1 medium onion, chopped

3 cup long-grain brown rice

1 can (14 1/2 ounces) chicken broth

4 cup dried cranberries

1 3/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

 

Directions: Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In 12-inch skillet, heat oil over medium heat until hot. Add carrots, fennel, celery, and onion, and cook 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender and lightly browned, stirring frequently. Stir in rice, chicken broth, cranberries, salt, thyme, pepper, and 4 1/4 cups water. Cover and heat to boiling. Pour rice mixture into 13- by 9-inch glass baking dish; cover with foil and bake 1 hour 15 minutes or until liquid evaporates and rice is tender

Serves 6

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 135 Calories; 2g Fat; 0g Sat Fat; 28g Carbohydrates; 3g Protein; 2g Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 265mg Sodium

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefinder/brown-rice-and-cranberry-stuffing-2947

How do you cook for someone with Diabetes?

One of the mantras I remember learning while studying for my CDE (Certified Diabetes Educator) exam in 2002 was “A carbohydrate is a carbohydrate.” The message is one can still have their cake and eat it too even if they have diabetes. Timing and quantity are key to eating all foods in moderation.

Read my newsletter to learn Diabetes Cooking 101: http://www.lauracipullollc.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/newsletter2006mar.pdf.

Women's Health Magazine

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