The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

LLC badge

The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.







Diabulimia: Learning More about your Teen and their Type-1 Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabulimia: Learning More about your Teen and their Type-1 Diabetes Diagnosis
By Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team


Diabulimia is an unofficial term, used by both the American Diabetes Association and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, to define a serious condition effecting, but not limited to, adolescent girls diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

Photo Credit: via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: via Compfight cc

An adolescent diagnosed with diabulimia (known formally as ED-DMT1) is characterized by the intentional misuse and manipulation of insulin for the purposes of weight loss and control. By decreasing, or skipping the necessary dose of insulin, the individual’s body cannot absorb the carbohydrate, which affects weight and causes high blood sugar. This is very dangerous state as high blood sugar can cause Diabetic Ketoacidosis.


Did you know diabulimia’s prevalence is most widely recognized in adolescent girls? Studies conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Pediatric Nutrition, report that an adolescent girl, with T1DM, is 2.4 times more likely to develop an eating disorder than her peers. While it is difficult to pinpoint the culprit behind diabulimia, the current assumption is the hyper focus on diet, control and weight. The strict diet associated with diabetes care and the pressures associated with women, eating, and body image could “exacerbate preexisting disordered eating tendencies.” (Childers)


If your tween or teen has diabetes, here are signs that may signify there is an element of disordered eating or an eating disorder:

  1. Frequent Diabetic Ketoacidosis
  2. Excessive Exercise
  3. Use of diet pills or laxatives to control weight
  4. Anxiety about or avoidance of being weighed
  5. Frequent and severe hypoglycemia
  6. Binging with alcohol
  7. Severe stress in family
  8. Frequent Insulin omission (Franz)

This is a relatively new branch to the field of nutrition, displayed by its mixture of symptoms and heath concerns.  It is important to remember the American Diabetes Association (ADA) continues to stress that there is no “one-size-fits-all” eating pattern for individuals with diabetes. When it comes to dietary recommendations, there is a strong emphasis on personal/cultural sensitivity and care. If your adolescent shows the above signs, it is highly recommended to seek a registered dietitian who specializes in both diabetes and eating disorders.


What do you think the prevalence of Diabulimia suggests about adolescent girls perception of health? How can we help to reframe this image?




  • Nancy, Childers, and Hansen-Petrik Melissa. “Diabulimia in Adolescent Females.” Pediatric Nutrition 37.3 (2014): 13-16. Print.
  • Franz, Marion J., and Kulkarni, Karmeen. Diabetes Education and Program Management. Chicago, IL: American Association of Diabetes Educators, 2001. 159. Print.

Fed Up? Well I am Fed Up With Blame!

Fed Up? Well I am Fed Up With Blame!
By Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team
Do scare tactics work?

I know the new documentary Fed Up declares that scare tactics have worked for decreasing tobacco sales. Personally, I worry that scare tactics will actually contribute to more fat shaming, diet shaming and finger pointing.

I was really surprised that Katie Couric narrated this film directing negative attention toward Michelle Obama, food companies and one evil — sugar. My surprise is specific to Katie’s history of an eating disorder.

As a certified eating disorder specialist, I know and hope Katie knows that deprivation and shaming lead only to more binging, overeating and weight gain. This black and white delineation simply contributes to the eating disorder mentality.

In addition, I personally don’t think scaring people into not eating sugar is any better than scaring them into not eating fat back in the 80s. That particular scare tactic definitely didn’t work. We all got “fatter”.

If we isolate just one macronutrient, people will continue to eat it secretly. Meanwhile, food companies easily reformulate their products to meet the new standard. Scaring and blaming merely nurture the “poor health epidemic” we have today.

That’s right! Here’s another very important point. First, let’s rename the “obesity epidemic”. Let’s call it the “processed food epidemic” or the “ill health epidemic.” Obesity is usually just the most visible symptom of a much larger problem.

As Fed Up points out, there are “skinny” fat people who are just as unhealthy. So why do we call this problem an obesity epidemic? It’s about health not size.


Read more at Your Tango:

EALM reviews: "PCOS: The Dietitian’s Guide"

In honor of National Nutrition Month, EALM reviews: “PCOS: The Dietitian’s Guide

Screen shot 2014-03-03 at 2.26.04 PM

Specializing in both eating disorders and endocrine disorders, I often encounter women with an ambiguous diagnosis of PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome). Some of these clients have struggled with weight issues for years and doctors have mentioned PCOS, but they do not have an official or clear diagnosis. When looking for resources to help these clients, I came across Angela Grassi’s The PCOS- Workbook and PCOS- The Dietitian’s Guide. Whether you are a woman with a potential diagnosis of PCOS or a dietitian looking to brush up on the condition, these books are much needed additions to your bookshelf.


Having been diagnosed with PCOS herself, Angela Grassi understands just how difficult it is to receive the correct diagnosis, as well as the complexities of living with the syndrome. Her first-hand experiences and knowledge as a registered dietitian help to offer a mind, body, and soul perspective to her readers.


It is estimated that PCOS affects between 6-10% of women worldwide, but getting diagnosed may be difficult. Many more women may be living without a diagnosis. A diagnosis typically requires two of the following criteria: Irregular or absent menstrual cycles, clinical or biochemical signs of increased androgen production, and polycystic ovaries (Rotterdam, 2003). Women may struggle for years before these symptoms are recognized. As dietitians, a client may present with weight struggles, disordered eating, or glucose abnormalities even before she knows she has PCOS.


What most women don’t know is that a lot of the symptoms of PCOS, such as hunger and weight gain are a result of their condition.  For example, did you know “women with PCOS have pre- and post-meal ghrelin impairments” (Page 31)? Ghrelin is a hormone that stimulates appetite. Complications of PCOS, such as infertility, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, can be reduced with lifestyle changes, making nutrition critical to the treatment of PCOS. However, “despite the benefits of weight loss, losing weight and maintaining weight loss is difficult in the general population and especially for women with PCOS (Page 31).”


Grassi reviews common diet trends and offers information on supplements that may be useful in this population. Did you know 1 tsp (3g) of cinnamon has been shown to reduce fasting blood glucose and improve long-term glycemic control (Page 52)? Pick up a copy of Grassi’s book to find more information about supplements that may help with the insulin resistance commonly found in women with PCOS.
The book goes on to describe challenges women may face throughout their lifetime.  It also touches on the psychological aspects of PCOS, including eating disorders. Because individuals with PCOS are at a higher risk for disordered eating and body image disturbances, dietitians must be aware of the signs and symptoms of disordered eating. Grassi offers dietitians and professionals various ways to screen for eating disturbances and tips for working with these clients.


This book summarizes current research, making it a great tool for any one looking to learn more about PCOS. It provides context to the disorder, offers practical advice, and reviews evidenced-based nutrition therapy in order to address treatment for the “entire” person. This particular book is intended for dietitians and health care professionals, but Grassi also offers a workbook for women with PCOS.

Screen shot 2014-03-03 at 2.25.44 PM For more information on both Angela Grassi and her books click here.

A Look Back at 2013

We covered a number of topics this past year, from hangover remedies, hydration, gluten, and positive body image. 2013 was a great year and we can’t wait to see what 2014 has in store for EALM and our readers. To take a trip down memory lane, we compiled a Table Of Contents of our 2013 blog posts. We hope you enjoy this blast from the past and we wish you all a healthy and happy 2014!

Screen shot 2013-09-25 at 4.33.12 PMJANUARY

Hangover Remedies

The Pros and Cons of Being a Vegetarian Fitness Enthusiast

6 Nutrition Trends of 2013

What a Difference a Title Makes: Nutritionist vs. Dietitian

4 Smart Superbowl Swaps

Photo Credit: prideandvegudice via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: prideandvegudice via Compfight cc


The Feast on Fat Tuesday for those Who Don’t Cook

Boosting Positive Body Image

Love Your Heart with 8 Heart-Healthy Foods

Power Up with Phytochemicals!


My Exercise Allergy

Protein, Fiber, and a Booty Barre Class? Sign Me Up!

All About Gluten: Your Questions Answered

Calcium and Vitamin D

Photo Credit: Alex E. Proimos via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Alex E. Proimos via Compfight cc


Spring Training…Let’s Head to the Races!

Genetically Modified Foods

Healthy in the Mind and the Body

Super Foods Super Expensive

Olive Oil, Extra Virgin, or Cold-Pressed…What’s the Difference?

Photo Credit: mischiru via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: mischiru via Compfight cc


How to Eat Your Water and Stay Hydrated

To Prevent Kidney Stones

Is Your Favorite Organic Restaurant Actually Organic?


How To Choose Safer, Sustainable Seafood

Fun and Easy Outdoor Activities for Father’s Day

Sprouted Grain Bread vs Whole Wheat Bread

3 New Moves

Photo Credit: Admanchester via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Admanchester via Compfight cc



Vitamins: The Basics

Fish Oil Linked to Prostate Cancer?

A Day at the Beach: So What’s for Lunch?

Join the Challenge on Food Waste



Breakfast, the Most Important Meal of the Day

Is Greek Frozen Yogurt Everyone’s Answer to Dessert?

10 Foods to Help You Fuel Your Day


Workout from Within

New FDA Ruling Making Waves in Gluten-Free Community

How to Feed a Fast!

National Celiac Awareness Day

Contrary to Popular Belief – Men, Also Suffer From Eating Disorders


What’s the Story with GMOs?

“Shattered Image”: An Interview with Brian Cuban

The Latest Diet Recommendations for Breast Cancer

Healthy Snack Options for Diabetics

Prostate Cancer: News and Recommendations

Canola Oil: Is It Healthy?


Should Your Oil be Cold-Pressed?

What Exactly is Diabulimia?

5 Simple Tips for a Simply Healthier You This Holiday Season

The Art of the Bliss Point


Out with ORAC

Eating in “Peace”

Eating Healthfully When Gluten-Free

Happy and Healthy Diabetes-Friendly Holiday Meals with Dessert!

Nutrition Trends: 2014 Edition

Happy and Healthy Diabetes Friendly Holiday Meals with Dessert!

Screen shot 2013-12-22 at 1.06.19 PM

Happy and Healthy Diabetes Friendly Holiday Meals with Dessert!
By: Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE, CEDRD, CDN and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team


Have you or someone you know been diagnosed with prediabetes or diabetes? We understand that adjusting to a lifestyle with diabetes can be overwhelming and frightening, especially when diagnosed near the holidays. It is for this very reason we are sharing my latest cookbook with you, The Diabetes Comfort Food Diet Cookbook. In concert with the editors of Prevention magazine, we set out to create a cookbook that gives families the tools they need to manage or reverse insulin resistance. By following the START approach, you learn to achieve and maintain a 5-10% weight loss all while continuing to eat the foods you love! This book contains an introduction to all things relating to diabetes and allows you to eat real sugar. No artificial sugar!! There are 200 recipes, plus a great deal of tips and tricks to maintain your blood sugar levels. Think cinnamon, monounsaturated fats and fiber.


As we say in the book: “a sweet life is possible.” It is in honor of our book that we wanted to share these 6 “Diabetes Friendly” holiday meal ideas (using recipes from the book DCFD) that are about 60 grams of carbohydrate or less to tantalize your taste buds and help to guide you to a successful self care dinner celebration. You can get started with a recipe straight from the pages of our book:


Screen shot 2013-12-22 at 3.59.22 PM

Screen shot 2013-12-22 at 4.02.14 PM


So as you can see, you can learn to eat real food, even warm comforting food that doesn’t spike your blood sugar. Happy and healthy holidays!! In honor of the spirit, we are giving away one free copy of the Diabetes Comfort Food Diet Cookbook.

Screen shot 2013-12-22 at 12.56.25 PM

Do you want a new favorite recipe? Click here to enter to win a copy!

What Exactly Is Diabulimia?

An excerpt from Holly Warfel’s, MS, RD, article titled: Just What Is Diabulimia?

You may have heard this word or even seen an article talking about it, but have you ever thought about what diabulimia actually is? This term is being used more and more in clinical practice to describe individuals with Type 1 diabetes who minimize or completely skip insulin doses in an effort to lose weight. While not recognized as an official “eating disorder” in the DSM, this practice is often considered a type of bulimia. Click here to continue reading Just What Is Diabulimia?


Screen shot 2013-11-06 at 1.46.50 PM

Healthy Snack Options for People with Diabetes

Actor Tom Hanks recently revealed to David Letterman that he has Type 2 Diabetes, which shocked many since he has a lean body and appears to be in good shape. However, it is important to note that Type 2 Diabetes does not discriminate.

We at EALM, wanted to share some diabetes-friendly snack ideas for Tom and others with Type 2 Diabetes from Laura’s new book; The Diabetes Comfort Food Diet CookBook:

  • Nature Box offers a variety of healthy snacks to help you make eating with diabetes a lifestyle, not just a temporary fix.
  • Bitsy’s Brainfood orange chocolate beet cookies are the perfect answer to a chocolate craving. They contain real fruit and veggies, packed with antioxidants that fight heart disease and the inflammation associated with diabetes.
  • Fit Popcorn is a great low carb, high volume snack for those watching blooding sugar. Think night snack!!popcorn
  • Chias and yogurt – try fruit-flavored chias topped with Greek yogurt for the best texture fix! Plus omegas and 2 servings of protein.
  • Kashi cereal – mix with nuts, seeds and M&Ms to keep carbs low, good fats high, and yet not feel deprived of candy. Who would have guessed they could have a few M&Ms with Diabetes?

Remember, Tom and all those with a Type 2 Diabetes diagnosis should keep snacks at 30 grams of carb or less to beat blood sugar damage!


This article was published on


Is Greek Frozen Yogurt Everyone's Answer to Dessert?


In the past few years, frozen yogurt has become an increasingly popular food. With its creamy texture, thick consistency, and boasting more protein than regular yogurt, it’s no surprise that Greek yogurt has expanded to a wide variety of products on the shelves. From shelf stable products like cereals or covered pretzels to Greek frozen yogurt ice cream, are the commercial products that contain this tangy yogurt just as healthy as Greek yogurt itself? Read on to find out if Greek frozen yogurt is everyone’s answer to dessert!

What Is Greek Yogurt?

The processing, flavor, and nutrition content of Greek yogurt differs greatly from regular yogurt. Greek yogurt has been strained, and the whey is removed; which yields a thick and creamy product. It is also tangier than regular yogurt. Its thick consistency allows for it to easily act as a substitute for many ingredients. For example, Greek yogurt can be used as a substitute for recipes that call for whole milk, sour cream, or even cream cheese! (Try Fage non-fat, plain Greek yogurt for a healthier alternative to cream cheese. It’s thick consistency allows it stay in tact yet spreadable on toasts!) Compared to regular yogurt, most Greek yogurts have higher protein and calcium content and lower added sugar content. Note that calcium content can vary depending on the brand and flavor of the yogurt. When food shopping, check the back of the nutrition label to see the percentage of calcium that the product contains. Typically it can vary from 20-50% calcium.

Is it Healthier?

With it’s reputation for being healthier, a recent trend is that people have been substituting Greek frozen yogurt for ice cream or frozen yogurt. But is it really healthier or just as healthy as Greek yogurt itself?  Here is breakdown of some popular items’ nutrient compositions:

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 3.56.41 PM

From the information above, you can see that Chobani non-fat Greek yogurt has the least calories as well as the most protein. Instead of focusing on the calorie content however, note that the protein content is what really sets Greek yogurt apart from the frozen products. The protein will increase satiety—essentially helping to keep you feeling full, longer—and it won’t spike your insulin. Compared to its frozen counterpart, this makes Greek yogurt a great everyday food choice for those who may have diabetes or are insulin resistant. And if you’re looking to reap the health benefits of Greek yogurt, enjoy it straight from the container or use it as a healthy alternative for recipes like salads, dips, and even cheesecakes!

It’s important to recognize that while Greek yogurt itself can be a nutritionally dense and tasty food, know that not every Greek yogurt product is going to have the same nutritional value. Unfortunately, the labeling of the product as “Greek frozen yogurt” may create a perception that it provides the same benefits as regular Greek yogurt. Products that claim to contain Greek yogurt (whether frozen or shelf stable) often contain added sugars like syrups or candy pieces, and fillers, which increase the saturated fat and dwindle the amount of Greek yogurt that is actually in the product.

Despite the differences between Greek yogurt or Greek frozen yogurt, the takeaway is that it is perfectly OK to enjoy Greek frozen yogurt (or simply ice cream!) sometimes as a snack or dessert. Remember, here at Eating and Living Moderately, we believe in enjoying all foods in moderation and balance!

















Love Your Heart with 8 Heart-Healthy Foods

February isn’t just the month of flowers, chocolates or spending time with the ones you love..but as heart health month, it’s also about loving your heart! Heart disease remains one of the leading causes of death for both men and women1. Lifestyle choices play a major role in preventing heart disease as well as controlling it. With this in mind, it’s never too early to start focusing on overall heart health. Show your heart how much you appreciate it by incorporating these heart healthy foods!

Berries – Please your heart with antioxidant rich berries like strawberries, goji berries and blackberries, which are an antioxidant powerhouse! Blueberries for example, house high amounts of phytonutrients like anthocyanidins, which aid in the process of neutralizing free radical damage in our cells. Consuming 1-2 portions of berries daily may help reduce cardiovascular disease risk2.

Brussel Sprouts – Tender, crunchy and just a little bit nutty, brussel sprouts have more to offer than just flavor. This cruciferous veggie contains vitamin C and vitamin A which help fight against heart disease, and vitamin Its high fiber content aids in digestion, helps lower cholesterol and reduces the risk for developing heart disease, stroke and hypertension3.

Chia Seeds – Chia seeds contain a high level of soluble fiber, which helps slow down digestion and regulates blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber can help lower LDL cholesterol, reduce risk for cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Just three tablespoons of these seeds can provide 37-44% of the American Heart Association’s recommended amount of fiber per day. Two tablespoons of chia seeds provide a 3:1 ratio of omega-3:omega-6 FA. With 3x more omega-3 than omega-6, adding chia seeds to a diet can help an individual reach optimal health by balancing out the ratio of fatty-acid intake in one’s daily nutrition. To learn more about chia seeds, click here.

Collard Greens – This cruciferous veggie is high in vitamins A,C, K and folate. It contains antioxidants and provides us with anti-inflammatory benefits.

Greek Yogurt – Low in saturated fat and cholesterol, Greek yogurt makes for a heart-healthy snack. It’s high in protein and calcium, which can help you stay fuller longer, while strengthening your bones.

Olives – Monounsaturated fats in moderation are heart-healthy fats that help lower blood cholesterol levels4. A rich source of monounsaturated fats is olives, which have been shown to lower LDL (“bad cholesterol”) and increase or maintain HDL (“good cholesterol”).

Salmon – High in omega-3 fatty acid, DHA and protein, salmon helps lower blood pressure and reduces inflammation5.

Wheat germ – Packed with B vitamins, the nutrients found in the grain play a vital role in maintaining heart-healthy bodily functions. In addition to lowering the risk of heart disease, B vitamins like folate are especially for women of childbearing age as well as any woman eating too little veggies or fruits. As an excellent source of fiber, wheat germ helps control cholesterol.