The EALM Blog Shelf

While Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team work on some new and exciting projects, you may notice less posts on the Eating and Living Moderately Blog. We have created a “blog shelf” below to keep you entertained and educated. Get caught up on the latest nutrition education by clicking on each year below. We will send you nutrition updates, but we will not be inundating your mailboxes on a weekly basis. If you want weekly “love” and inspiration, subscribe to our Mom Dishes It Out blog for weekly posts and recipes. Mom Dishes It Out provides expert advice from mom Registered Dietitians and mom Speech Pathologists on the “how to” of health promotion!

LLC badge

The EALM Blog Shelf

Please feel free to peruse our posts organized by year below. Or take a look at the categories listed at the bottom of the page to find a post in the desired.







Entertain the Concept of Health this Holiday Season

Photo Credit: ecstaticist via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: ecstaticist via Compfight cc

Tis the season of food, food and food. So how do we manage our health while entertaining and celebrating?  Instead of fearing weight gain or trying for weight loss during the holidays, let yourself maintain your current weight. Think slow and steady wins the race. However this is not a race rather an almost 2 month period of eating and drinking.  This year, vow to make the holiday season healthy with family and friends as the focus and these tips to plan a mindful season balanced between food and fitness.

5 Tips Celebrate Health and Holidays

  1. Focus on Family and Friends – Growing up in an Italian family I remember the holidays were about food and family. Instead of making food for 25 people, we made enough for 50 people. Instead of sitting around the fire, we sat around the table. If this was your family, start a new tradition this year. Celebrate you health and the holiday season by focusing on family and friends not food. Have family and friends come over to socialize rather than eat. You can serve food, but don’t center the evening on/around the food and the act of eating all of it.
  2. Plan Fitness – With limited time, shopping exhaustion and colder weather, our fitness routines get displaced. Since moving increases your energy, your mood and your metabolism, this is the last thing you want to give up over the holiday season. Instead, make dates with friends to go yoga together rather than getting drinks. Schedule spin class or any classes that you have to pay for if you miss. This is a great incentive to make sure you attend class.
  3. Make a date. Use you daily planner or PDA to schedule all activities, whether it is food shopping, meal prep, exercise or therapy. If it gets scheduled just like any important meeting, you will set the precedent to ensure this activity gets done.
  4. Slow down and Savor – Being a foodie, I know how hard it is not to celebrate with food. However, you can change your mindset of that of your guests too by hosting smaller more intimate holiday parties. Create small intense flavorful meals. Start the meal off with a prayer, a toast or even a moment of silence to allow you and your guests to refocus, create inner calm, and engage in mindful eating.
  5. Use Your Five Senses: Rather than race through your holiday meal and overeat, be sure to use all 5 senses while eating. Smell your food and think about memories the aroma may conjure up. Touch your food; Is your bread hot and crusty or naturally rough with seeds and nuts? Think about the texture and how it makes you feel. Really look at the plate. Is the food presented beautifully? Are there multiple colors on your plate, there should be. Listen to the food, yes listen to see if the turkey’s skin is crispy or the biscotti crunchy. And finally taste your meal!! Many people eat an entire meal and Can never tell you what it really tasted like. They were too busy talking, or shoveling the food in so they could either leave the dinner table or get seconds. This holiday season, be healthy mentally and physically by truly tasting your food and appreciating each bite. A small amount of food tasted will fulfill you more than a few plates of food you never tasted would.



Chef It Up…Read EALM’s kitchen “aides”

Chef It Up…Read EALM’s kitchen “aides”
By Laura Cipullo and the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Ever wonder about the best way to store coffee, the correct temperature for cooking a cut of meat, or how to make a flakey pasty crust?

In today’s digital age we often just turn to Google for instantaneous answers to all of our questions. But there’s nothing quite like having this information in one easily accessible place. Keep in mind that not everything we read on the Internet comes from reliable sources. Finding trustworthy answers to these kinds of questions often requires us to research many different sites. Whether you are a dietitian, chef, home cook, or simply someone who eats (i.e. ANYONE!), you probably have a variety of questions about food and cooking. Why does a certain food do that when it cooks? Where does our food come from?  How has food changed over the years? If you’re at all curious about food or cooking, here are three highly recommended books to help answer your questions…whether you’re an at-home food scientist, a “YUMPIE” chef or simply a literature loving foodie. These books are sure to make your epicurean experiences that much more satisfying.


Three kitchen “aides” to help the three different kinds of foodies:

For the scientific cook:

Screen shot 2014-09-07 at 12.30.05 PM

On Food and Cooking by Harold McGee

For the more experienced and the science-minded person, On Food and Cooking by Harold McGee is a great resource—an encyclopedia dealing exclusively with food and cooking—and one of my favorites reference sources! McGee’s book contains definitive answers to many of our everyday food questions…and so much more. The book begins by focusing on the most commonly used ingredients. So here are just a few of the things you can learn: the difference between cream and milk, how eggs are graded, and various cooking methods for meat and fish. It provides descriptions of some of the more than 2,000 cultivated varieties of edible plants. It discusses different flavors. It explains the baking process and how to create a variety of sauces. It reveals how to brew alcoholic beverages. And it includes in-depth descriptions of cooking methods and materials. This book is a “must have” for nutrition and culinary students as well as professional chefs. It’s also a great reference tool for the at-home chef to keep close at hand. You can easily research the reasons behind a specific food reaction and/or quickly find answers to your daily cooking questions.


For our “YUMPIE” chefs:

Screen shot 2014-09-07 at 12.28.11 PM

Cooking for Geeks: Real Science, Great Hacks and Good Food by Jeff Potter

If you want to learn about food science but actually are not too fond of science, Cooking for Geeks: Real Science, Great Hacks, and Good Food by Jeff Potter may be the perfect book for you. A quick read, it helps you effortlessly expand your knowledge about food science. Potter breaks down the complexities of food science into easy-to-understand terms. And once you understand the science behind cooking, you’ll be able to view your recipes from entirely new perspectives. Your kitchen will be stocked with blank canvas for you to create masterpieces. Potter also includes some basic foundational recipes to help the concepts solidify in your brain. You’ll learn why something happens and then be able to attempt it in your own test kitchen!


By the way…. YUMPIE is a real word! A YUMPIE is a young, educated, career-orientated person who wants to get ahead in the world.[i] Don’t believe me? Check out


For the literature-loving foodie:

Screen shot 2014-09-07 at 12.32.15 PM

Consider the Fork by Bee Wilson

If you want to learn more about food and cooking but are really more interested in the story than the science, Consider the Fork by Bee Wilson would be perfect for your next beach read or even a good option for your book club. Written by food writer and historian Bee Wilson, Consider the Fork takes you on an adventure depicting how your kitchen tools affect your food. Written as a novel rather than a reference tool, it includes some science and history but is also interwoven with personal experiences. Wilson’s book provides an interesting visualization about how the tools we’ve used throughout history have shaped what we eat today.


No matter what stage of the game you currently may have reached in your kitchen comfort, knowledge and/or expertise, you’ll learn much more about food and how best to prepare it with each one of these books. Not only will they help you when you’re in the kitchen, but you’ll also be able to impress your family and friends with some fun food facts the next time you’re out for lunch or dinner. Or, perhaps, if you wind up trying to solve a crossword puzzle laden with food clues!

[i] YUMPIE. Available at

Healthy Summer BBQ Menu

Originally published on

It’s about that time of year again – the time when we open our barbecue grills to family and friends. Set yourself up with paper and pen because you’re about to start the planning process. Read through this, fully imagine the scene, and then procure everything you’ll need for your own healthy BBQ.

Your ideal BBQ will feature whole grains, fruits, veggies, and beans for carbs, lean proteins like fish, chicken and > 90% lean cuts of meat, and healthy fats such as omega 3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs).


As predicted, cauliflower is one of the hottest vegetables of 2013. Impress your friends by grilling fresh cauliflower and ears of corn. Instead of Cuban corn, you are serving up “C2” – Cuban cauliflower and corn with yummy queso. Whole Foods now carries queso… just in case you need to find it. I bet no one else will be so clever at the grill! And oh, don’t forget that Brussels sprouts are still trendy, so why not make Brussels sprout slaw or grilled Brussels sprouts on skewers?

On the Grill

Next, buy some shrimp and 90% lean grass-fed beef. Grill the shrimp on skewers brushed with lime and tequila. Serve them in a big bowl next to freshly made salsa. If you don’t want to make your own salsa, your farmers’ market or local Mexican restaurant probably has some ready for purchase.

Make mini beef sliders topped with avocado slices and fresh grapefruit flesh. Your taste buds will dance! I promise! And your guests’ bellies will be full from the lean protein and healthy fats like the omega 3 fatty acids in the shrimp and the monounsaturated fats from the avocado.


And finally, for the après BBQ snack, bring out frozen and refreshing mini key lime pies sprinkled with wheat germ. Make one for each guest and serve them with fresh blackberries or raspberries. Your guests will be feeling a spring in their steps… and you’ll sleep well knowing you helped their hearts.

Screen shot 2014-07-05 at 8.47.37 PM

See below for recipes…


Sprouts on a Skewer

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1 pound Brussels sprouts, stems removed
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Ground black pepper to taste
  • 6 metal skewers (10”)



Prepare grill to medium heat. In a large microwave-safe bowl, combine the Brussels sprouts, olive oil, garlic powder, dry mustard, salt and pepper. Microwave on high for 2-3 minutes. Remove and allow the sprouts to cool before handling.

Add 5 or 6 Brussels sprouts to each skewer. Place on grill with cover on for about 6 minutes. Rotate and grill for another 4 to 5 minutes, or until the sprouts have a nice char. Remove them from the skewers and adjust seasonings. Serve immediately.


Cuban Cauliflower and Corn

Ingredients (Serves 6-8)

  • 1 head of cauliflower, leaves removed and cut into large florets
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp ground pepper
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • 6 ears of corn, husk on but silk removed
  • 1 cup queso fresco
  • Heavy duty aluminum foil



Prepare grill to medium heat. In a large bowl, combine cauliflower florets, olive oil, salt, pepper, paprika and chili powder. Place the cauliflower mixture on a large sheet of heavy-duty aluminum foil and fold up the edges to create a sealed pouch. Place foil pouch over grill for about 30 minutes, or until the cauliflower is tender.

In another large bowl, soak the ears of corn for 15 minutes. Remove from water and pat dry. Place the corn on the grill and cover for about 20 minutes, rotating the corn 2 to 3 times. When cooked through, remove the corn and allow it to cool. Remove kernels from the cobs. When cauliflower is ready, toss the corn kernels and cauliflower together. Serve warm or cool with a side of queso.


Beef Sliders

Ingredients (serves 12)

  • 1 lb ground beef, 90% lean, grass fed
  • ½ cup yellow onion, diced
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp olive oil, plus more for brushing the grill
  • 3 tsp garlic, chopped
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 12 mini size whole-wheat rolls
  • Optional toppings: lettuce, avocado, grapefruit, sliced tomatoes, pickles


In a large bowl, gently combine the beef, onion, mustard, olive oil, garlic, parsley, salt and pepper. Form twelve 2” patties (about the size of a golf ball or 3 tbsp each).

Prepare an outdoor grill on medium to high heat. Place burgers on hot grill and cook for about 10 minutes or until meat is cooked through; learn more about food safety here.

If you like, toast rolls on the grill for a minute. Otherwise, serve the burgers on rolls with 2 tbsp avocado and 1 tbsp grapefruit! Get the younger ones involved by letting them dish out the avocado and grapefruit.


For more recipes, please go to