Exercise Tips from APMA

4 Important Exercise Tips from the American Podiatric Medical Association.

Target Heart Rate: “As you work out, monitor your heart rate to stay near the target heart range (start with 220, subtract your age, then multiply by 0.8 to find target heart range). You should be within five of the target range. Monitor pulse at peak and after final cool-off and compare. The difference is known as your cardiac reserve.”

Hydration: “Drink adequate water to avoid dehydration during workouts which can cause nausea, dizziness, muscle fatigue, and cramping.”

Cool Down: “Don’t under estimate the importance of the cool-off period. It burns off lactic acid (which makes muscles feel tired) and adrenalin, while keeping blood from pooling in the extremities.”

Pace Yourself: “While fitness professionals exercise vigorously six times a week, it’s best to start slower. Although it varies by the individual, it’s safe to start exercising twice a week for several weeks, then gradually increase to a maximum of five times a week. Remember to pace yourself, and listen to your body. If you feel pain, stop. Don’t attempt to exercise through pain, or you may aggravate an acute injury into a chronic or even permanent one. If you continue to be bothered by pain more than 24 hours after exercising, see a physician.”

The above is taken directly from http://www.aapsm.org/aerobics.html.

Tips to Avoid Mindless Eating

In 2009, I attended a seminar Turning Mindless Eating tm Into Mindless Weight Loss taught by Brian Wansink, PhD Food Psychologist at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. Here are the tips I learned:

Tips to Avoid Mindless Eating

  1. Repackage snacks into individual sized bags to prevent overconsumption. Larger containers make us more likely to over-indulge.
  2. Store foods in cupboards or the pantry rather than on the counter or other open area. You’ll be less likely to mindless munch on foods if you have to go out of your way to get them.
  3. Eat on smaller dinner plates. Using larger plates leads us to overfill our plate unintentionally and consequently eat more.
  4. Be cautious of food labels claiming “low-fat,” “low-sugar,” or “low-calorie.” These foods can cause people to overeat because they don’t feel as “guilty” about consuming them in comparison to the regular versions.
  5. If you are feeling sad, don’t use food to try to improve your mood.  Instead, try going for a walk, watching a movie, or talking to a friend.
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Give thanks for a healthier Thanksgiving:

Are you counting down yet? In less than 22 days you will either be making or eating some yummy stuffing. Start planning now. Here are 3 recipes to make your Thanksgiving heart healthy. There is a recipe to meet everyone’s food preference –    the meat lover, the vegetarian and  of course the vegan. Use low fat, low salt broth in the following recipes to make them even healthier.

 

Low Fat Bread and Sausage Stuffing

Ingredients:

4 ounces chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed

1 teaspoon canola oil

1 cup chopped onion

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup chopped mushrooms

1 tablespoon fresh sage, finely chopped

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1 pound day-old artisan bread cubes

1 14 1/2–ounce can fat free, low sodium chicken broth

1 egg, lightly beaten, or 2 egg whites

 

Directions: Spray a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray. Cook sausage meat until browned, breaking it into chunks with a spatula. Remove from pan and set aside. Add 1 teaspoon canola oil to skillet. Add onion, celery and mushrooms, and sauté until tender. In a large bowl, combine bread cubes with cooked sausage, vegetable mixture, herbs and pepper. Whisk together broth and egg, and pour over stuffing mixture. Toss well to coat. Spoon stuffing into 13-inch x 9-inch baking dish and bake at 350 degrees for 40-45 minutes, or until browned.

Serves 12

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 134 Calories; 2.7g Fat; 0.6g Sat Fat; 21.8g Carbohydrates; 6.5g Protein; 1.6g Fiber; 23mg Cholesterol; 341mg Sodium

http://lowfatcooking.about.com/od/holidayrecipes/r/breadstuff1104.htm

 

 

Vegetarian Thanksgiving Stuffing

Ingredients:

8 slices whole wheat bread

1 1/2 cups vegetable broth

1 1/2 cup chopped onion

1 1/2 cup chopped celery

¼ cup granny smith apples (finely chopped with skin on)

1/3 cup fat-free liquid egg substitute

1 tablespoon fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon fresh thyme

1 tablespoon fresh sage

2 tablespoons light butter

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Directions: Start by drying out your bread. You can either do this by toasting in the oven, or by leaving the bread sit out at room temperature overnight. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a medium pot, combine chicken broth, onions, celery, apples, butter, salt, pepper, rosemary, thyme and sage. Cook for about 15 minutes over medium heat. Meanwhile, break up your bread into small ½” pieces by chopping or just breaking apart with your hands. Put bread into a large oven safe dish. When broth mixture is ready, slowly pour onto bread, making sure to cover all the pieces. Next, mix in the egg substitute and make sure to cover all pieces. If bread cubes do not seem wet enough (they should be moist, but not saturated), add a tablespoon or two of warm water until appropriate texture is reached. Season with more salt and pepper if desired. Cover dish with foil and transfer to over. Cook for about 25 minutes. Then, take out stuffing, mix it around and fluff it a bit and put back in the oven, uncovered for about another 15 minutes.

Serves 4
Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 229 Calories; 5.1g Fat; 2.4g Sat Fat; 32.5g Carbohydrates; 13.8g Protein; 5.7g Fiber; 8mg Cholesterol; 637mg Sodium

http://www.laaloosh.com/2009/11/20/low-calorie-thanksgiving-stuffing-recipe/#ixzz1csvpvywI

 

 

 

Brown-Rice and Cranberry Stuffing

Ingredients:

2 tablespoon olive oil

3 medium carrots cut into 1/2-inch dice

2 medium fennel bulbs, cored and cut into 1/4-inch dice

2 stalk celery, cut into 1/4-inch dice

1 medium onion, chopped

3 cup long-grain brown rice

1 can (14 1/2 ounces) chicken broth

4 cup dried cranberries

1 3/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

 

Directions: Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In 12-inch skillet, heat oil over medium heat until hot. Add carrots, fennel, celery, and onion, and cook 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender and lightly browned, stirring frequently. Stir in rice, chicken broth, cranberries, salt, thyme, pepper, and 4 1/4 cups water. Cover and heat to boiling. Pour rice mixture into 13- by 9-inch glass baking dish; cover with foil and bake 1 hour 15 minutes or until liquid evaporates and rice is tender

Serves 6

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 135 Calories; 2g Fat; 0g Sat Fat; 28g Carbohydrates; 3g Protein; 2g Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 265mg Sodium

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefinder/brown-rice-and-cranberry-stuffing-2947

How do you cook for someone with Diabetes?

One of the mantras I remember learning while studying for my CDE (Certified Diabetes Educator) exam in 2002 was “A carbohydrate is a carbohydrate.” The message is one can still have their cake and eat it too even if they have diabetes. Timing and quantity are key to eating all foods in moderation.

Read my newsletter to learn Diabetes Cooking 101: http://www.lauracipullollc.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/newsletter2006mar.pdf.

Women's Health Magazine

Congratulations to Beth for winning an Initial Nutrition Consult with Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE.

Thanks to everyone who participated in nutrition counseling at the September Women’s Health Magazine  Are You Game event!!

To have a chance at winning a free consult, “like” Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services

on Facebook. Help us get 200 Likes by Thanksgiving.

Pumpkinlicious

Tis the the season of pumpkin. Pumpkin is delicious and a great source of Beta Carotene and Vitamin C. So go ahead and try these pumpkinlicious recipes.

 

Pumpkin Hummus

 

Ingredients

1 15-ounce canned pumpkin

2 tablespoons tahini

1 garlic clove, chopped

1 tablespoon fresh parsley, finely chopped

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon olive oil

1/2 teaspoon cumin

1 tablespoon lemon juice

 

Directions

In a food processor, combine ingredients until smooth and creamy. If hummus is too thick, you can add 1 tablespoon of water at a time until desired consistency.

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 102 Calories; 5.5 g Fat; 0.9g Sat Fat; 13.1g Carbohydrates; 2.8g Protein; 4.4g Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 306mg Sodium

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpkin Ravioli

 

Ingredients

1 cup canned pumpkin

1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

24 wonton wrappers

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup chicken broth

1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Chopped parsley

 

Directions

Combine 1 cup pumpkin, 1/3 cup Parmesan, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon black pepper in a large bowl. Spoon about 2 teaspoons pumpkin mixture into center of each wonton wrapper. Moisten edges of dough with water and bring the 2 opposite sides together to form a triangle, pinching edges to seal. Place ravioli into a large saucepan of boiling water with 1 teaspoon salt and cook for 7 minutes. Drain in a colander. Place 1/2 cup broth and 1 1/2 tablespoons butter in pan and bring to a boil. Add ravioli, tossing to coat. Sprinkle with parsley.

Serves 6

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 162 Calories; 5 g Fat; 4g Sat Fat; 22g Carbohydrates; 6g Protein; 2g Fiber; 17mg Cholesterol; 505mg Sodium

 

 

 

Pumpkin Enchiladas

 

Ingredients:

3/4 yellow onion, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 10-ounce can of red enchilada sauce

1 15-ounce can pumpkin

1cup black or kidney beans

Large bunch of cilantro, chopped

1 1/2 tablespoon cumin

1 teaspoon chili powder

1/2 cup shredded cheese

5 ounces 0% greek yogurt

5 6” whole wheat tortillas

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Sauté onion and garlic in a pan sprayed with cooking spray. Stir in enchilada sauce. Add pumpkin and stir until combined. Add cilantro, cumin and chili powder.  Spread a light layer of sauce on the bottom of an 8×8 or 9×9 pan. Fill tortillas with an even amount of sauce and beans. Roll tortillas and place in the pan with the folded edges facing down to keep them closed. Top with remaining sauce and sprinkle with cheese. Bake for 10 minutes or until cheese melts. Serve with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt.

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 235 Calories; 7 g Fat; 2.52g Sat Fat; 33.6g Carbohydrates; 12g Protein; 7.9g Fiber; 11.9mg Cholesterol; 604mg Sodium

 

What can you get to eat on a college campus in 2011?

Campus Eats

Compiled By: Human Nutrition Student, Kate Kaczor

1. Stanford University– Who doesn’t love frozen yogurt? Stanford is home to Fraiche Yogurt. Fraiche is a homemade, organic fresh yogurt and frozen yogurt cafe, serving European-style yogurts made from local organic milk and a probiotic-focused culture. Available toppings include fresh-cut fruits, local honeys and purees, toasted nuts, homemade granola, and hand-shaved Callebaut chocolate. Stanford also has lots of vegetarian, vegan, and kosher options. A student-run farmer’s market is also located on campus.

2. Pitzer College– The Shakedown is a student run restaurant at Pitzer, which serves up only the best organic locally grown food. There also is the Pitstop cafe, which is a coffee shop in the academic quad. It has any coffee drink you could want, baked goods, and organic juices!

3. Occidental College– Occidental strives to provide its students with the most organic and local food possible. In its dining hall, Marketplace, the salad bar always carries organic choices including organic spring mix lettuce, tofu and carrots. They often incorporate organic and local ingredients into their homemade cooking. Wednesdays at dinner the Marketplace serves an Organic Baked Potato Bar including russet and sweet potatoes with organic toppings and produce from local farmers. For your sweet tooth, The Cooler, another dining location, features hand-dipped ice cream made by Fosselman’s, a local family owned business.

4. Ohio Wesleyan University– Chartwells, the company that prepares food for dining halls at Ohio Wesleyan University, offers microwaveable meals that students can take away, as well as a program called “My Pantry,” where students can have food individually prepared, or even do their own cooking. You can also get a sweet treat for your birthday at OWU. Bring your ID to the bakery on the first Monday of your birthday month and get a free cupcake!

5. St. Olaf College– St. Olaf is committed to buying locally grown foods whenever possible, including vegetables and herbs from STOGROW, their student-run organic farm, meat and poultry raised without antibiotics or growth hormones, apples from an orchard just minutes from campus and dairy products supplied by Deja Moo, a collective of Midwestern, family-owned farms. Fresh, healthy, and delicious.

6. Warren Wilson College-WWC’s Cowpie Café is a campus favorite, offering healthy and delicious vegetarian and vegan options. Much of the produce from the garden, as well as other local goodies, makes its way into Cowpie’s kitchen. Also, all beef and pork served in Glad, WWC’s all-you-can-eat dining hall, comes straight from the farm.

7. Emory University– Many campuses are beginning to offer farmers markets to their students and the surrounding community, but Emory’s is unique in that it is year-round (except for summer breaks). Emory Farmers Market features fresh, local produce, organic and sustainably produced meat, bread, cheese, honey and other artisan products. In addition to providing delicious, healthy, and convenient food choices to the Emory community, the market encourages students to interact with Georgia farmers, expand their knowledge about healthy eating and sustainable production.

8. Columbia University– Columbia also encourages students to eat locally. Local Honey from Ballards Honey (Roxbury, NY), as well a locally produced, processed and packaged strawberry jam and tomato salsa are served in John Jay Dining Hall and Ferris Booth Commons. For a fall treat, all Columbia’s apples and fresh apple cider are from Red Jacket Orchards, Geneva, NY.

9. Virginia Tech University– For upscale dining on a college campus, there is no better place than VT. Their West End Market features made-to- order items prepared before the customers and offers specialties such as London broil, live Maine lobster, and steak on a daily basis.

10. Bryn Mawr College– This school has an extensive salad bar offering over 40 items made fresh daily (including hummus)! At all meals, students can also find rice and soymilk, a vegan bread selection, veggies burgers, and a variety of freshly steamed rice.

Tell us what you are eating on your campus!!!

What are you giving out for Halloween?

Trick-or-Treat: Keeping Halloween Healthier Yet Fun.

With Halloween around the corner, why not think outside the box? We can’t trick our Halloween visitors but we can treat them to new Halloween delights. Read on to get some healthier options, unconventional goodies, and finally a run down at the candy counter.

New Delights:

Clif Kid Twisted Fruit Rope, Clif Z Bar (granola bars), Organic raisins, Blue Diamond mini nut packs – almonds, Bearito’s No Oil No Salt Microwave Popcorn or Earth’s Best Organic Puree (fruit and veggies pureed like applesauce in squeeze pack)

Unconventional Goodies:

Tattoos, bouncy balls, yo-yos, stickers, pencils, chalk and mini coloring books

Candy Counter:

For those that adhere to moderation the top 5 Halloween candy picks: Smarties, Tootsie Pops, York Peppermint Patties, Twizzlers and Milk Duds

 

**Just know I will be giving out Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups because they taste so yummy and a variety of the above!!

 

Optional Reading – nutritional information listed below:

  1. Smarties: 25 calories, 0 grams of fat, 6 grams of sugar (per roll)
  2. Tootsie Pop: 60 calories, 0 grams of fat, 10 grams of sugar (per lollipop)
  3. York Peppermint Patty: 60 calories, 1 gram of fat, 0.5 grams of saturated fat, 10 grams of sugar (per snack size patty)
  4. Twizzlers: 160 calories, 1 gram of fat, 0 grams saturated fat, 19 grams of sugar (4 pieces)
  5. Milk Duds: 170 calories, 6 grams of fat, 3.5 grams saturated fat, 20 grams of sugar (13 pieces)