How do you cook for someone with Diabetes?

One of the mantras I remember learning while studying for my CDE (Certified Diabetes Educator) exam in 2002 was “A carbohydrate is a carbohydrate.” The message is one can still have their cake and eat it too even if they have diabetes. Timing and quantity are key to eating all foods in moderation.

Read my newsletter to learn Diabetes Cooking 101: http://www.lauracipullollc.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/newsletter2006mar.pdf.

Women's Health Magazine

Congratulations to Beth for winning an Initial Nutrition Consult with Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE.

Thanks to everyone who participated in nutrition counseling at the September Women’s Health Magazine  Are You Game event!!

To have a chance at winning a free consult, “like” Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services

on Facebook. Help us get 200 Likes by Thanksgiving.

Calling Guest Bloggers

If you are a mom with a food story about raising your kids in a moderate and wholesome way, let me know. I would love to give other moms the opportunity to share their trials and tribulations on raising happy and healthy eaters at www.MomDishesItOut.com.

Pumpkinlicious

Tis the the season of pumpkin. Pumpkin is delicious and a great source of Beta Carotene and Vitamin C. So go ahead and try these pumpkinlicious recipes.

 

Pumpkin Hummus

 

Ingredients

1 15-ounce canned pumpkin

2 tablespoons tahini

1 garlic clove, chopped

1 tablespoon fresh parsley, finely chopped

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon olive oil

1/2 teaspoon cumin

1 tablespoon lemon juice

 

Directions

In a food processor, combine ingredients until smooth and creamy. If hummus is too thick, you can add 1 tablespoon of water at a time until desired consistency.

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 102 Calories; 5.5 g Fat; 0.9g Sat Fat; 13.1g Carbohydrates; 2.8g Protein; 4.4g Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 306mg Sodium

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpkin Ravioli

 

Ingredients

1 cup canned pumpkin

1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

24 wonton wrappers

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup chicken broth

1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Chopped parsley

 

Directions

Combine 1 cup pumpkin, 1/3 cup Parmesan, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon black pepper in a large bowl. Spoon about 2 teaspoons pumpkin mixture into center of each wonton wrapper. Moisten edges of dough with water and bring the 2 opposite sides together to form a triangle, pinching edges to seal. Place ravioli into a large saucepan of boiling water with 1 teaspoon salt and cook for 7 minutes. Drain in a colander. Place 1/2 cup broth and 1 1/2 tablespoons butter in pan and bring to a boil. Add ravioli, tossing to coat. Sprinkle with parsley.

Serves 6

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 162 Calories; 5 g Fat; 4g Sat Fat; 22g Carbohydrates; 6g Protein; 2g Fiber; 17mg Cholesterol; 505mg Sodium

 

 

 

Pumpkin Enchiladas

 

Ingredients:

3/4 yellow onion, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 10-ounce can of red enchilada sauce

1 15-ounce can pumpkin

1cup black or kidney beans

Large bunch of cilantro, chopped

1 1/2 tablespoon cumin

1 teaspoon chili powder

1/2 cup shredded cheese

5 ounces 0% greek yogurt

5 6” whole wheat tortillas

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Sauté onion and garlic in a pan sprayed with cooking spray. Stir in enchilada sauce. Add pumpkin and stir until combined. Add cilantro, cumin and chili powder.  Spread a light layer of sauce on the bottom of an 8×8 or 9×9 pan. Fill tortillas with an even amount of sauce and beans. Roll tortillas and place in the pan with the folded edges facing down to keep them closed. Top with remaining sauce and sprinkle with cheese. Bake for 10 minutes or until cheese melts. Serve with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt.

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 235 Calories; 7 g Fat; 2.52g Sat Fat; 33.6g Carbohydrates; 12g Protein; 7.9g Fiber; 11.9mg Cholesterol; 604mg Sodium

 

What can you get to eat on a college campus in 2011?

Campus Eats

Compiled By: Human Nutrition Student, Kate Kaczor

1. Stanford University– Who doesn’t love frozen yogurt? Stanford is home to Fraiche Yogurt. Fraiche is a homemade, organic fresh yogurt and frozen yogurt cafe, serving European-style yogurts made from local organic milk and a probiotic-focused culture. Available toppings include fresh-cut fruits, local honeys and purees, toasted nuts, homemade granola, and hand-shaved Callebaut chocolate. Stanford also has lots of vegetarian, vegan, and kosher options. A student-run farmer’s market is also located on campus.

2. Pitzer College– The Shakedown is a student run restaurant at Pitzer, which serves up only the best organic locally grown food. There also is the Pitstop cafe, which is a coffee shop in the academic quad. It has any coffee drink you could want, baked goods, and organic juices!

3. Occidental College– Occidental strives to provide its students with the most organic and local food possible. In its dining hall, Marketplace, the salad bar always carries organic choices including organic spring mix lettuce, tofu and carrots. They often incorporate organic and local ingredients into their homemade cooking. Wednesdays at dinner the Marketplace serves an Organic Baked Potato Bar including russet and sweet potatoes with organic toppings and produce from local farmers. For your sweet tooth, The Cooler, another dining location, features hand-dipped ice cream made by Fosselman’s, a local family owned business.

4. Ohio Wesleyan University– Chartwells, the company that prepares food for dining halls at Ohio Wesleyan University, offers microwaveable meals that students can take away, as well as a program called “My Pantry,” where students can have food individually prepared, or even do their own cooking. You can also get a sweet treat for your birthday at OWU. Bring your ID to the bakery on the first Monday of your birthday month and get a free cupcake!

5. St. Olaf College– St. Olaf is committed to buying locally grown foods whenever possible, including vegetables and herbs from STOGROW, their student-run organic farm, meat and poultry raised without antibiotics or growth hormones, apples from an orchard just minutes from campus and dairy products supplied by Deja Moo, a collective of Midwestern, family-owned farms. Fresh, healthy, and delicious.

6. Warren Wilson College-WWC’s Cowpie Café is a campus favorite, offering healthy and delicious vegetarian and vegan options. Much of the produce from the garden, as well as other local goodies, makes its way into Cowpie’s kitchen. Also, all beef and pork served in Glad, WWC’s all-you-can-eat dining hall, comes straight from the farm.

7. Emory University– Many campuses are beginning to offer farmers markets to their students and the surrounding community, but Emory’s is unique in that it is year-round (except for summer breaks). Emory Farmers Market features fresh, local produce, organic and sustainably produced meat, bread, cheese, honey and other artisan products. In addition to providing delicious, healthy, and convenient food choices to the Emory community, the market encourages students to interact with Georgia farmers, expand their knowledge about healthy eating and sustainable production.

8. Columbia University– Columbia also encourages students to eat locally. Local Honey from Ballards Honey (Roxbury, NY), as well a locally produced, processed and packaged strawberry jam and tomato salsa are served in John Jay Dining Hall and Ferris Booth Commons. For a fall treat, all Columbia’s apples and fresh apple cider are from Red Jacket Orchards, Geneva, NY.

9. Virginia Tech University– For upscale dining on a college campus, there is no better place than VT. Their West End Market features made-to- order items prepared before the customers and offers specialties such as London broil, live Maine lobster, and steak on a daily basis.

10. Bryn Mawr College– This school has an extensive salad bar offering over 40 items made fresh daily (including hummus)! At all meals, students can also find rice and soymilk, a vegan bread selection, veggies burgers, and a variety of freshly steamed rice.

Tell us what you are eating on your campus!!!

What are you giving out for Halloween?

Trick-or-Treat: Keeping Halloween Healthier Yet Fun.

With Halloween around the corner, why not think outside the box? We can’t trick our Halloween visitors but we can treat them to new Halloween delights. Read on to get some healthier options, unconventional goodies, and finally a run down at the candy counter.

New Delights:

Clif Kid Twisted Fruit Rope, Clif Z Bar (granola bars), Organic raisins, Blue Diamond mini nut packs – almonds, Bearito’s No Oil No Salt Microwave Popcorn or Earth’s Best Organic Puree (fruit and veggies pureed like applesauce in squeeze pack)

Unconventional Goodies:

Tattoos, bouncy balls, yo-yos, stickers, pencils, chalk and mini coloring books

Candy Counter:

For those that adhere to moderation the top 5 Halloween candy picks: Smarties, Tootsie Pops, York Peppermint Patties, Twizzlers and Milk Duds

 

**Just know I will be giving out Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups because they taste so yummy and a variety of the above!!

 

Optional Reading – nutritional information listed below:

  1. Smarties: 25 calories, 0 grams of fat, 6 grams of sugar (per roll)
  2. Tootsie Pop: 60 calories, 0 grams of fat, 10 grams of sugar (per lollipop)
  3. York Peppermint Patty: 60 calories, 1 gram of fat, 0.5 grams of saturated fat, 10 grams of sugar (per snack size patty)
  4. Twizzlers: 160 calories, 1 gram of fat, 0 grams saturated fat, 19 grams of sugar (4 pieces)
  5. Milk Duds: 170 calories, 6 grams of fat, 3.5 grams saturated fat, 20 grams of sugar (13 pieces)

 

Mom Dishes It Out

So with heightened nerves, I have entered two new worlds. One being the MAC Book Pro and the other, the world of Twitter. You can follow me at @MomDishesItOut. I will be tweeting about Mom things concerning raising our kids and food. My new mommy blog is useable www.MomDishesItout.com but not too pretty yet. Give me a few days and the new blog will be as yummy as a Magnolia’s cupcake. Cheers!!

The Other Butter:

My oldest son’s school is “NUT SAFE” meaning nut free. For many parents, this leaves us in bewilderment when trying to make our kids a nut free snack or lunch. This is especially challenging when we have picky palates to deal with.

The Solution:

If you can no longer send peanut butter to school, spread some soy nut butter on your kid’s sandwich. Shh, don’t tell them and see if they notice the difference. My picky eater noticed something was different, but liked it. Even better was when I sent the soy nut butter to school for snack week, the teachers reported the class loved eating it as their protein choice during snack time. The teachers commented that they were sharing the idea with the class parents.

Soy foods are listed as one of the top eight food allergens but are neither a peanut or tree nut. Therefore, they are typically safe and appropriate in a nut free environment. To learn more about food allergies specifically peanuts and tree nuts visit:  http://www.foodallergy.org/page/tree-nut-allergy. For more information on feeding your kids, stay tuned for my new mommy blog:  www.MomDishesItOut.com!!!